Harpswell Inn Cowl

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This cowl fits closely around the neck and is a really warm cowl. If you want it looser, you can make more squares or use a larger needle. Have fun! 

HARPSWELL INN COWL

(designed and knit at the Harpswell Inn Knitting Weekend, 2017)


1 skein Lamb’s Pride Worsted (MC)
1 skein Gina by Plymouth (CC)
(Two worsted weights, about 175 yards of MC and about 70 yards of CC)

Size 7 double pointed needles

16” size 7 circular needle  

Tapestry needle

OPTIONAL -- stitch markers, if you use a circular needle or two for Magic Loop method or two circulars method instead of using double pointed needles

Gauge: one square = 3.75 inches square

The cowl is made by knitting 2 tiers of 6 squares, each tier off-set by half a square to provide visual interest.

FIRST SQUARE:

With MC, cast on 60 sts on 4 needles (15 sts on each needle) OR divided into 4 sections with stitch markers and join into a round without twisting.
Round 1: Knit.
Round 2: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (13 sts per needle/marker section, 52 sts in the square)
Round 3: Purl.
Round 4: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (11 sts per needle/marker section, 44 sts in the square)
Round 5: Purl
Round 6: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (9 sts per needle/marker section, 36 sts in the square)
Round 7: Purl
Round 8: Knit

Cut yarn; attach CC.

Round 9: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (7 sts per needle/marker section, 28 sts in the square)
Round 10: Purl
Round 11: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (5 sts per needle/marker section, 20 sts in the square)
Round 12: Purl
Round 13: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (3 sts per needle/marker section, 12 sts in the square)
Round 14: *Slip 2 sts as if to knit, k1, pull the 2 slipped stitches over the knit st -- double centered decrease made* around. (1 st per needle/marker section, 4 sts in the square)

Cut yarn and thread onto a tapestry needle, and run through the 4 sts and pull tight. Weave in all ends. *Weave in the ends as you go or there will be a LOT of ends to weave in at the end!*

SQUARES 2 THROUGH 5:

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the previous square with your needle; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on each needle/each section marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

SQUARE 6 (COMPLETES THE FIRST TIER AND JOINS THE CIRCLE TOGETHER):

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the previous square with your needle; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next needle/next section marked off by st markers; pick up 15 sts on Square 1 with your next needle; cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next needle/next section marked off by st markers; join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

You have 6 squares done! Now for the second tier of 6 squares.

SECOND TIER

SQUARE 7:

Pick a point about halfway along the edge of a square -- you can line up the center of the square to do this. With MC, pick up 15 sts on the edge of the squares with your needle (make sure you have ended picking up sts at the halfway point of the next square); using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on each needle/each section marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

SQUARES 8 - 11:

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the edge of the square just made; pick up 15 sts along the bottom edge of squares of the first tier with your needle, making sure that the sts end up about halfway along this square; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next two needles/on next two sections marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

SQUARE 12 (JOINS 2ND TIER INTO A CIRCLE):

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the edge of the square just made; pick up 15 sts along the bottom edge of squares of the first tier with your needle, making sure that the sts end up about halfway along this square; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, pick up 15 sts on the edge of Square 7; cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next two needles/on next two sections marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends. Now you have two tiers of squares and your cowl is almost done.

ATTACHED I-CORD FINISHING:

Using CC, cast on 4 sts and then continue to pick up 100 sts around the edge of the cowl. Work attached i-cord as follows: *Knit 3 sts, k2tog; put 4 sts back on your left needle*. Repeat between *’s around the edge of the cowl. Sew i-cord ends together with a couple stitches and weave in ends.

Repeat for other edge.

 


So Much Fun!

I have had so much fun the last couple of weeks! 

First, the things I have knitted: not much, actually. I have my stealth knitting project almost completed. In fact, it will be finished this week probably, and I can go to Freeport at the end of the week with a clear conscience. I have, in addition, sewn up my Sylvi coat/sweater, woven in most of the ends, and am now working on the hood:

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It is kind of hard to knit because of the weight of the sweater and only having one and a quarter hands, but it is going slowly onward. I hope to finish it next week, after SPA in Freeport. At least Hillary will be able to wear it for a couple weeks before Spring!

Second is the goodies that I have bought.

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I pre-ordered MAINEknits by Beatrice Perron Dahlen a few weeks ago, and promptly forgot it, and then there it was! I wanted to get it when I realized that all of the patterns in it were in my favorites in Ravelry, which was a sign that the book needs to be on my shelf.  I was pleased to find that the book has really gorgeous pictures of Maine, a foreword by Pam Allen, and well-written essays by Sarah Kilch Gaffney, Julie Letowski, Samantha Lindgren and Beck Robbins in addition to beautiful, highly-wearable and desirable-to-knit patterns by fourteen excellent designers, including Beatrice Perron Dahlgren. 

The book is divided into three sections: Sea, Farm, and Wild, which is how I think of Maine too. I'm from Aroostook county, Maine, the wilderness was all around me in Portage where I lived, my father was a farmer, and now I live by the sea! There are five or six patterns in each section, totaling seventeen patterns in the book. Most of them are sweaters and accessories for women, but a few are unisex too, and one is photographed on a man and a child; that sweater can be made in children's sizes too. There is also a cowl in child and adult sizes as well. 

I also got some little colored stitch markers from Cocoknits.com. They are so pretty, I want to string them on a chain and wear them as a necklace! 

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I succumbed to pattern lust and bought the yarn to make these socks:

They are 173-45 Sleepy Sheep from Drops.

Karisma

They are so springy and pretty! I don't really need 450g of yarn to knit socks. I'll have yarn leftover, so maybe I will design something with Mary Jane Mucklestone's books that I have been looking over.

The best thing though is the fluff that I got from On the Round! It is soooooooo gorgeous! It makes me want to spin and spin and spin! 

Fluff

This fluff is hand dyed Corriedale top in a OOAK (One Of A Kind)  color. That means it is unique!  Rachel Jones does an incredible job of dyeing. Her colors are imaginative, playful, and creative while being harmonious too. It takes real talent to do that. I will wait as long as possible to start spinning this, but I think the beauteousness of the fluff will overwhelm me. It is sitting right beside my computer and I keep looking at it and sighing happily. I need to get a couple things done, but soon ... soon!

The third and final fun thing is ahead: SPA!!! Lynne and I are going to Freeport for the weekend (February 24,25, & 26) and we will have so much fun. We are staying at the Hampton Inn. SPA is a weekend of fibery goodness that is at three hotels in Freeport, but it really kind of takes over the town. It is like a convention of 1000 (maybe more) knitters and crocheters and spinners and weavers and felters and other fibery folk who show up for the weekend. Some people go for three or four days. Lynne and I will pretty much stay in the Hampton Inn; the vendor area doesn't really interest me much (see above) but there are many vendors and people who want their wares. Also Mother of Purl is in the area and there are a few things that they offer too this weekend, including an On the Round trunk show -- Rachel will be there in person to amaze and delight you! 

Pogo's Sweater

I haven't the heart to tell Pogo that the sweater isn't for her.


Project Peace

Blogger Christina is trying to change the world, and I think she is succeeding. Her blog The Healthy Knitter is having a 21-day tips for peace during December, and it coincides with a "Peace-along" on Ravelry, with her free pattern for a lovely cowl. My Daily Mindfulness blanket has languished but it will still be there in January. I'm going to join her for the peace-along, and I urge you to join me too! 

Project peace

So far she has gotten over 20,000 people to read her peace tips every day and join her peace-along. That is 20,000 individual people whose lives she has impacted in  a good way, a peaceful way. 

"And we need peace…with turmoil, and acts of violence, hatred and anger occurring daily in our country and throughout the world it’s time to take action. Often I think "but I’m just one person" but maybe, just maybe with Project Peace we can spread ideas on how to choose peace. Perhaps then, we can slowly make some changes. We’ll never overcome evil but we must find ways to cope with it."

from The Healthy Knitter, November 10, 2016

So, what do you do? Here is what she said back in November:

Here's how you join in:

  • Download the cover page of the pattern on Ravelry
  • This is only the cover page; the pattern will come to you as an update on 11/28.
  • Read the information about the project requirements
  • Please click on "fav" on Ravelry, begin a project page for the cowl, and join the Healthy Knitter group.
  • Beginning December 1, read the blog daily for 21 days to receive the tip of the day on how to infuse more peace into your life.

Will you help me promote this?

Here are some ideas on how you could spread the word:

  • Spotlight Project Peace on a blog post
  • Post on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or other forms of social media
  • Include in your electronic or print newsletter
  • Provide a give-away to those that help spread the word
  • Tell all your knitting friends, clients, customers, readers, family.

Also, there is a World-wide Knit-in for Peace on December 21. Will you will knit for peace on that day?

I think this is a great idea! It is sort of like SETI, but instead of helping to locate alien signals, we will be promoting world peace! Using knitting needles! I can get behind that.

My project for peace will be Christina Campbell's cowl knit in Wildwood Yarns Arcadia in a pretty blue-pink-purple colorway. To me, it looks like peace. 

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Heck, whatever you do to be mindful and peaceful would work too! Whether you draw, crochet, quilt, craft, sew, doodle, whittle sticks or make baskets, just do it. Be peaceful, and help others be peaceful too!

 


It's Winter, So Get Over It: Make a Cowl, Not a Scowl!

Everyone is crabby, because all they can see is snow, snow, snow and more snow. More is falling as I speak. When I was a kid, up in northern Maine, this kind of winter was typical. For the past number of years we haven't had a winter with all this snow, and it is hard to go back to it now. It's hard to drive in, it's cold, and it's boring. I hear on Facebook that kids are out of school and driving their parents crazy, and business owners complain that no one is out shopping because they're all holed up at home. That is true. 

Yarn shops that are lucky enough to be in a town with a sidewalk to their door are doing some walk-in business, and you can always order yarn in if you need to. I ordered a skein of Ontheround's Merino Wool Aran Weight when it was on sale a while ago, and over the fall I hugged it and petted it. It's so soft and squishy and lovable. The colors are a blend of green and yellow and white and blue and gray, beautifully dyed, and over this winter it has seemed like a touch of Spring. However, I needed something warm, so I invented a cowl that sits around my neck and shoulders, keeping me warm, and looking pretty. 

Yarma_medium2-2    Yarma_medium2-1    Yarma_medium2

I'm giving the pattern to you:

Stranded Cowl by Beth Collins

Ontheround Merino Worsted 
Size US10.5/6.5mm 16” circular needle

Gauge: 
15.5 sts and 22 rnds = 10 x 10 cm/4” x 4”

Finished measurements: 7" high by 28" around

Cast on 112 stitches (I like it loose; use 100 stitches if you want it tighter. Pattern is a multiple of 4.) Join, being careful not to twist the stitches.

(Knit a round, purl a round) twice. Begin Woven Stitch pattern:

Round 1:•K2, yf, sl2, yb; rep from • to end. 
Round 2: Knit. 
Round 3: •Yf,sl2,yb, k2; rep from • to end. 
Round 4: Knit.

Repeat these 4 rounds for pattern. Work in pattern for 7” or desired height. (Knit a round, purl a round) twice. Bind off loosely and weave in ends.

Abbreviations: 
k = knit 
p = purl 
yf = yarn to front 
yb = yarn to back 
sl = slip

(Pattern Stitch “Double Woven Stitch I” adapted from the Harmony Guides Knit & Purl, edited by Erika Knight, p. 76)

The center picture above shows that I had only a little yarn leftover, so if you want a higher cowl, you may want another skein.

I may have to knit another cowl with Ontheround's new DK weight yarn. She certainly makes wonderful yarn! 

I found that stranding the yarn across two stitches was a good way to show off the yarn; hand dyed yarn can be gorgeous in the skein, but sometimes it is disappointing knit up. Stranding really showed the beautiful colors as well as the thick-and-thin quality of the yarn. I love that.

Knitting needle Knitting needle

In other news, my Aran sweater is done. I took some pictures of it before it was whisked away upstairs to be worn today. It fits perfectly :)

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It looked better with Nicky sleeping on it, but this is pretty good :)





Baby Cables Fingerless Mitts

The last Unique One Knitting Weekend that I went to, back in March 2010, I gave out this pattern for baby-cable fingerless mittens -- they are quick, easy mitts and are a warming touch when the air gives you a chill. They are also a good gift to make for Christmas, and since some people are thinking about that, I thought I would put the pattern here. I somehow dimly recall doing that once before, but I can't find where I did it, so I'll put it on my blog once again with a link on the side. Happy knitting!

BabyCableMitts

Baby Cables Fingerless Mittens

Materials: 2 skeins USDK yarn (light dk weight, 100% wool, 88 yards per skein) size 2 double pointed needles

tapestry needle

Size: womenʼs small (you could make a medium or a large by going up one or two needle sizes; USDK is squishy, so it works well on a size 2 needle, but it would work very well on up to a size 6 needle.)

Gauge: 7 sts and 9 3/4 stitches per inch over stockinette stitch on size 2 needles Pattern Stitches:

Baby Cable Pattern (worked in the round):

Rounds 1, 2, & 4: (K2, P2) around. Round 3: (RT, P2) around

RT = knit into the 2nd stitch on the left hand needle, but do not take the stitch off; knit into the first stitch on the left hand needle, and then take both stitches off.

Baby Cable Pattern (worked in rows): Rows 1, 2 & 4 : K1, (K2, P2) to last stitch, K1.

Row 3: K1, (RT, P2) to last stitch, K1.

Directions:

Cast on 60 sts. Work Baby Cable Pattern in the round for 3 1/2 inches or desired length to bottom of thumb. End having just completed either Round 2 or Round 4, and increase one stitch at each end of last round.

Create thumb opening: Stop working in the round, and continue working on double pointed needles, but going back and forth (when you reach the end of the round, turn the work and go back the other direction.) Keeping Baby Cable pattern as established, work Baby Cable pattern worked in rows (see pattern stitch above) until piece measures 5 3/4 inches from beginning. Decrease one stitch at each end of last row.

Finish top of mitt: Join work back into a round again and keep working Baby Cable Pattern as established, working in rounds again, until mitten measures 1 1/2 inches above where you joined it, or desired length to top of mitten. Bind off loosely in pattern and weave in ends. 

 


Designed by Beth: 2 Color Hat

What a charming title, right? I must have been feeling really unimaginative when I came up with that one, sheesh.

Anyway, it's another hat pattern, and though it is pictured in purple and white (I used lupine and natural Bartlettyarn), it looks fantastic in more manly colors too, and it's a pretty quick knit for the holiday season.

2colorHat

2-Color Hat

Materials:

•Bartlettyarn or Christopher Sheep Farm yarn: 1 skein each Color A (main color) and Color B (contrast color)

•size 7 16-inch circular needle

•size 7 double pointed needles

•a tapestry needle

 

Gauge: 4 1/2 sts and 5 rows equals 1 inch in Fair Isle pattern; 4 3/4 sts and 7 rows equals 1 inch in plain stockinette

Size: Adult Medium

Hem: With Color A and circular needle, cast on 96 sts. Join, being careful not to twist sts. Place marker to mark end of round. Work in stockinette stitch for 24 rounds. Form Picot Edge: (yo, k2tog) around. Working in stockinette, join Color B and complete Trim chart 1; work 1 round plain in Color A; work Snowflake chart 2; work 1 round plain in Color A; work Trim chart 3. Break off Color B. Work even in Color A until 6 inches or fesired height above Picot Edge.

Decrease for top: Work as follows, switching to double pointed needles when necessary.

Round 1: *k 2, k2tog* around.

Rounds 2 - 7: Knit around.

Round 8: *k 1, k2tog* around.

Rounds 9 - 12: Knit around.

Round 13: *k 1, k2tog*around.

Round 14 - 16: Knit around.

Round 17: *k 1, k2tog*around.

Round 18: Knit around.

Round 19: *k2tog* around.

Break yarn, pull end through all remaining stitches and pull to tighten the top together. Weave in all ends on the inside. Sew hem to inside of hat. Attach pom pom or tassel if desired.

Charts

Glossary and Abbreviations:

K = knit

p=purl

st(s) = stitch(es)

k2tog=knit2stitchestogether

 

Download 2-Color Hat.pdf (206.3K)

Designed by Beth: Two Watch Caps

It's time to start the Christmas knitting, so here are two little watch caps for the men in your life. They fit women, too! 

WatchCap_medium

Fingering Weight Ribbed Watch Cap

1 Size: Men's medium          

Yarn: 1 skein Trekking XXL or other sock/fingering/baby yarn
Needles: 16" circular and double pointed needles, size 2
Gauge: 15 sts = 1" in unstretched knit 2, purl 2 ribbing
Cast on 168 sts. Join, being careful not to twist. Work in knit 2, purl 2 ribbing until piece measures 9 1/2". 
Decrease for top:
Work 1 rnd in ribbing, placing markers as follows: work 20, pm, k 2, pm, work 42, pm, k 2, pm, work 38, pm, k 2, pm, work 42, pm, k 2, pm, work 18.
Rnd 1: Keeping ribbing intact, *work to within 2 sts of marker, work 2 sts tog, slip marker, k 2, slip marker, work 2 sts together, repeat from * around, end knitting the remaining sts.
Rnd 2: Work 1 round even.
Repeat these two rnds until you have 56 sts remaining. K2tog around.
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail. Run tail through the stitches and draw them up tight. Weave end in on inside. Weave in the tail.

 


Hat_medium

Worsted Weight Watch Cap

Gauge

5.5 stitches per inch, 7.5 rows per inch

Size

Adult Medium 

Materials:  

215  yards yards worsted weight yarn

Size 6 douple pointed or 16-in. circular needles

Cast on 108 sts. Place marker, join. 

Edging

Round 1: *K2, p2. Repeat from * to end of the round.

Repeat Round 1 until piece measures 5" or desired length from the cast-on edge (watch cap has a turned up ribbing).

 Body

Work in stockinette stitch until piece measures 10" or desired length from the cast-on edge.

 Crown

On the next round (work 11 sts, k2tog) 4 times. Then (work 12 sts, k2tog) 4 times. [100 sts]

Work one round even.

Round 1: *Work 8, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [90 sts remain]

Round 2: Work even

Round 3: *Work 7, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [80 sts remain]

Round 4: Work even

Round 5: *Work 6, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [70 sts remain]

Round 6: Work even

Round 7: *Work 5, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [60 sts remain]

Round 8: Work even

Round 9: *Work 4, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [50 sts remain]

Round 10: Work even

Round 11: *Work 3, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [40 sts remain]

Round 12: Work even

Round 13: *Work 2, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [30 sts remain]

Round 14: Work even

Round 15: *Work 1, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [20 sts remain]

Round 16: Work even

Round 17: *K2tog. Repeat from * around. [10 sts remain]

 

Finishing

Cut yarn, a generous tail. Draw tail through remaining stitches on the needle. Pull gently to close hole. Weave in tail.

Weave in ends.

 


Designed by Beth: Wandering Path Socks

I designed these socks for the knitting cruise, and I knit two pair of them, one in blue and the other pair in purple. I still wear them today. I loved knitting them, and I hope you like to  knit them too!

Wandering Path Socks

Wandering path socks

 

Materials:

Size 2 double pointed needles

100 grams fingering weight sock yarn 

 

Gauge: 7 sts per inch

 

Cast on 60 sts and join without twisting. Work knit 1, purl 1 ribbing for 1 1/2 inches. Increase to 72 sts in the last row of ribbing.

 

Work Wandering Path Sock chart until sock leg measures about 7 or 8 inches, ending with row 16.

Chart

Divide stitches in half and work heel flap over 36 sts, working back and forth on 2 needles: 

Row 1: *slip one, knit one* across, turn.

Row 2: Slip first stitch and then purl the rest of the stitches in the row. 

Repeat these 2 rows 17 times. Work Row 1 one more time. 

 

Turn heel: 

Row 1: Purl 20, purl 2 together, purl one, turn. 

Row 2: Slip one, knit 5, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn. 

Row 3: Slip one, purl 6, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 4:Slip one, knit 7, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn. 

Row 5: Slip one, purl 8, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 6: Slip one, knit 9, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

Row 7: Slip one, purl 10, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 8: Slip one, knit 11, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

Row 9: Slip one, purl 12, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 10: Slip one, knit 13, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

Row 11: Slip one, purl 14, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 12: Slip one, knit 15, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

 Pick up 18 stitches along side of heel flap, knit across 36 stitches from top of foot, pick up 18 stitches on other side of heel flap, knit half of the stitches for the heel flap.

Decrease gusset stitches:

 Round 1: Needle 1: Knit to last 3 stitches on needle 1, k2tog, k1; Needles 2 & 3:  knit across; Needle 4: k1, ssk, knit to end of needle.

Round 2: Knit around. 

Repeat Rounds 1 and 2 until a total of 72 sts remain (18 sts on each needle). 

Continue working in stockinette stitch until foot measure 7 1/2 inches, or 1 3/4 inches less that total length of foot. 

 

Work toe:

Round 1: Needle 1 & Needle 3: Knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k 1; Needle 2 & Needle 4: k1, ssk, knit to end; 

Round 2: Knit around. 

Repeat Rounds 1 and 2 until 36 sts remain. Then work Round 1 only until there are 4 sts on each of the needles (16 sts). Knit across sts on Needle 1. Place sts from Needles 1 and 4 on one dpn and put sts from Needles 2 & 3 on another dpn, and Kitchener stitch the toe together. Weave in ends.

 

 

 

 


Designed By Beth: Braided Cable Scarf

Braided Cable Scarf

Braided Cable Scarf

This cabled scarf is fun to knit, and itʼs reversible, too!

Materials:

Size 10.5 needles

2 hanks Blueberry Farm alpaca/merino/silk (or about 210 yards of sport/dk weight yarn)

Special cable stitches:

C6B: put 6 stitches on cable needle, hold at back of work, work next 6 stitches in K1, P1 as established, work stitches from cable needle in K1, P1 as established

C6F: put 6 stitches on cable needle, hold at front of work, work next 6 stitches in K1, P1 as established, work stitches from cable needle in K1, P1 as established

Directions: Cast on 28 sts. Work in the following pattern until you are nearly out of yarn; bind off

loosely.

Rows 1 - 5: K5, (K1,P1) 9 times, K2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

Row 6: K 5, (k1, p1) 3 times, C6B, K2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

Rows 7- 11: K5, (K1,P1) 9 times, K2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

Row 12: K 5, C6F, (k1, p1) 3 timesK2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

(Repeat these 12 rows for pattern.)



Pattern Referrals

One of my biggest referring websites is Knitting Pattern Central. They have my Gansey Gloves, Net Shopping Bag, Rainy Day Scarf (also known as the Wavy Scarf), and the Bobble Hat listed in their free pattern directory. I get about 100 hits a day from them.

Bobblehat-full

I wonder how many hits a day I would get if the Penobscot Bay Pullover, the Catnip Mouse, and the Lacy Scarf were on there, too. The Penobscot Bay Pullover was always popular when I had the store. especially since it was great for men and kids. So was the Lacy Scarf, for that matter.

Pbgphoto

I also get significant numbers from Tipnut.com and Curbly.com, for my Net Shopping Bag pattern. Who knew such a little thing would be so popular! AllFreeKnitting.com has also got the Net Shopping Bag, and there's a link to it on KnittingHelp.com. Yarnover.net has a link to my Ribbed Leaves Lace Scarf pattern.

Netbag-full

I designed nearly all of these patterns for the knitting cruises or the knitting weekends that Unique One used to hold at the Lord Camden Inn. Since my stroke, I have designed only three things. And, I have a few things that I have designed that aren't up anywhere.

How many of my designs have you knit? I'm curious.

Ganseyglove_1-full


Diagonal Rib Scarf

This pattern is so simple, but I thought you'd like to have it. It was really the beginning to my Rainy Day Scarf idea. I originally knit it to show off the yarn samples we got from Earthtones handspun yarn, and kept it out with the yarn, and so many people asked for the pattern that I handed it out. When Earthtones left for greener pastures (Colorful Stitches in Lenox, Massachusetts) I was very happy to see the yarn take off; however, they wanted to have the yarn exclusively, and I knew they could order a lot more than I could, so I let it go.

The scarf has a ribbing pattern that goes diagonally up the scarf. It's easily memorized, makes great TV knitting, and it's reversible, which is always nice in a scarf. It's written for sport weight yarn, but you could use any yarn, really. It's good for my handspun! Even under plied handspun!

I'll add a picture to the pattern as soon as I knit one up. (The Earthtones one is long gone.)

Here ya go:


DIAGONAL RIB SCARF


MATERIALS:  2 2-oz. skeins sportweight Earthtones handspun yarn
                  size 8 (5 mm) straight needles
Gauge varies and really, it's only a scarf.
Pattern is a multiple of 4, plus 2.
Cast on 42 sts. Knit 2 rows. Work in diagonal rib pattern until piece measures 482 or desired length. Knit 2 rows. Bind off all sts. Add fringe, if desired.

Diagonal Rib pattern:

Row 1: K 1, *p2, k2, repeat from * to last st, k1.

Row 2: K1, p1, *k2, p2, repeat from * to last 4 sts, k2, p1, k1.

Row 3: K3, *p2, k2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p2, k1.

Row 4: K2; *p2, k2, repeat from * to end.

Repeat these 4 rows for pattern.  

Stop when you run out of yarn! 

 


Fun Things I Found on the Internet

1. Did you know there's a knitted Mona Lisa?

MonaLisa
(Photo Credit: Steve Plummer)

It's done in shadow knitting; you can see it here. Pat Ashforth and Steve Plummer, two retired math teachers, have launched into a world of "Illusion Knitting" and have lots of fun things on their web site. You can even buy patterns! (Here is the link on Ravelry; they also have very cool mathematical knitted stuff too!

2. A Dalek Doggy suit.

IMG_1548_medium2

(Photo Credit: Peach Kraft on Ravelry)

Ya gotta love it, even if it does exterminate you. This is a free Ravelry download pattern, so go nuts.

3. Doctor Jayne Hat:

Doctor_Jayne_Hat_2

(Photo Credit: holynarf (Lindsay)

It's a Jayne hat in construction, but with the fourth Doctor Who scarf colors. I think it's totally awesome. I hesitate to knit the really loooong Doctor Who scarf, but a hat ... seems like a good compromise. I love that it's the best of two worlds, too. It's just awesome. The pattern is here and on Ravelry (free download)

That's all for today! You never know what I'll turn up next!


Housework

Sharon asked me for my catnip mouse pattern, and it got me thinking I should rearrange my whole blog -- you know, the sidebar stuff that I usually don't change. So I did; do you like it? Most importantly, I put all the patterns, which I have put here on the blog over the years, under "Beth's Free Patterns" as links on the side, so you can get at them easily. The catnip mouse is on the top of the pile.

In exchange, what I would like is for people to send me pictures of the mice they have knit with their (or someone else's) cat(s) playing with them. Don't worry, there's no knitting police, you don't have to do it, but I think it would be fun because I have a cat obsession. And if you have pictures of any of my other patterns you've knit, throw their pictures in, too (cats are not necessary, but welcomed in these pictures). It will give me a warm feeling to see the stuff I have designed coming to life. That's one thing I miss about the knitting cruises and the knitting shop; I never get to see that stuff anymore! I will post your pictures here on my blog only if you give me your permission, I promise.

Grace 

"Please send your pictures so Mommy won't chase us around with a camera anymore. It's frightening."


MuckleMitts!

My friend Mary Jane just put a great pattern on her blog. It's Mucklemitts, and she used Motif #172 from her fabulous book, 200 Fair Isle Motifs: A Knitter's Directory. It's a great pattern, it'll bust your stash, and I'm gonna knit a pair! I have ordered Mary Jane's book too; I can't wait to get it. The MucklestoneMitts pattern is a good illustration of what  to do with her book -- use it!

MuckleMittsPhoto from http://maryjanemucklestone.com

The vest is coming along well; I've indented the armholes and I have about 6" done on the upper part. That leaves 6 1/2" to go. Then I've got the front and the neckband and armbands to do .... and then sewing it together. Should be fun.

Vest2

The catnip mice I knit for Nick, Nora and Grace turned out great. This picture is them before they were set loose among the cats:

CatnipMice

The have been well played with. I love how my cats love their toys :)

 


Long Overdue!

I found this pattern and typed it up -- thank goodness for cut & paste!

The .pdf version is here, complete with photos.

Short Row Scarf or Wrap

Materials:

1 skein Audrey by Schaefer Yarns (or 700 yards light fingering weight 50% silk, 50% merino yarn)

Size 4 needles, straight or circular

 

Finished measurements: It’s really, really long, like 6 feet, and quite wide when unfolded. Unfolded, it’s wide enough for a small wrap. I like it folded in half for a scarf though; the little scallops lay not-in-synch with each other and it’s quite pretty. Play with it to see how it best suits you. I gave it away as a Christmas present; I’ll get the measurements if I ever make it again.

 

 

 

Cast on 60 sts. 

Work in segments as follows:

Rows 1 & 2: K 58, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 3 & 4: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 54, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 5 & 6: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 53, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 7 & 8: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 52, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 9 & 10: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 51, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 11 & 12: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 50, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 13 & 14: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 49, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 15 & 16: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 48, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 17 & 18: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 47, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 19 & 20: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 46, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 21 & 22: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 45, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 23 & 24: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 44, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 25 & 26: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 43, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 27 & 28: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 42, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 29 & 30: K 1, inc in next stitch, K 41, turn, knit back to end.

(begin decreases)

Rows 31 & 32: K 1, K2tog, K 39, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 33 & 34: K 1, K2tog, K 36, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 35 & 36: K 1, K2tog, K 33, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 37 & 38: K 1, K2tog, K 30, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 39 & 40: K 1, K2tog, K 27, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 41 & 42: K 1, K2tog, K 24, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 43 & 44: K 1, K2tog, K 21, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 45 & 46: K 1, K2tog, K 18, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 47 & 48: K 1, K2tog, K 15, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 49 & 50: K 1, K2tog, K 12, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 51 & 52: K 1, K2tog, K 9, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 53 & 54: K 1, K2tog, K 6, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 55 & 56: K 1, K2tog, K 3, turn, knit back to end.

Rows 57 & 58: K 1, K2tog, turn, knit back to end. 

Rows 59, 60, & 61: Knit across all 60  sts. (You can make adjustments to the stitch count here if you’re off; I was off by a stitch or two here and there, having forgotten an increase or decrease when whatever was on TV distracted me. It’s a very forgiving pattern!)

 

Continue making segments until you have reached the last segment that you have enough yarn to complete, or end after any segment once the desired length is reached.  Bind off very loosely.

 

Disclaimer: I was halfway through knitting this when I had my stroke. It was going to be for the next Evans cruise (sorry, guys). After I found I could knit again, I dug it out and finished it. I do not know if the pattern I had written before the stroke, and which is written above, really works or not; in reading it through, I *think* it does, it sounds right, and it ought to work, but I don’t really know if it does til I knit it again, or if someone test knits it for me. And I have to wait until I run across it in Audrey before I will knit it again, that’s just the way I am, hehe.

Modular knitting like this is wonderful for knitting with hand-dyed yarn. Every little scallop comes out differently, each one is unique. You can really see how the short rows change the colors. I hope you enjoy knitting this as much as I have! Try different yarns, different weights, see what you come up with. Knitting is always an adventure!

 

Beth Collins

 

 


Wave Hat Is Done

I think this hat looks like waves or ripples in the water :)

Screen shot 2011-07-03 at 1.01.58 PM

Wave Hat

Materials: 200 yds. Good Karma Farms 60/40 merino/alpaca blend, or worsted weight wool

Size 6 needles -- 16” circular and double pointed

Tapestry needle

Using long-tail cast on, cast on 106 sts. Join, being careful not to twist sts. (Purl 1 round, knit 1 round) 3 times, increasing 20 sts in last round (126 sts).

Note: I like a loose brim on hats because it is easier to put them on and take them off one- handed; if you want a tighter brim, use a needle one or two sizes smaller, and switch back to larger needles for the Wave Stitch.

Work the 8 rows of the Wave Stitch 5 times, as follows:

Rnd 1: Knit

Rnd 2: (K 2, C2B) around

Rnds 3 - 5: Knit

Rnd 6: (C2F, K 2) around

Rnds 7 & 8: Knit

Repeat these 8 rounds for pattern; end having just finished round 8. You may increase or decrease the height of the hat if you work the Wave Stitch pattern more or less than 5 times; just make sure you end having just completed Round 8.

Decrease for top (change to double pointed needles when necessary):

Rnd 1: (K 4, K2tog) around

Rnd 2: (K 1, C2B) around

Rnds 3 & 4: Knit

Rnd 5: (K 3, K2tog) around

Rnd 6: C2F around

Rnds 7 & 8: Knit

Rnd 9: (K 2, K2tog) around

Rnd 10: C2B1 around

Rnds 11 & 12: Knit

Rnd 13: (K 1, K2tog) around

Rnd 14: LT around

Rnds 15 & 16: Knit

Rnds 17, & 18: K2tog around.

Break yarn, thread through the sts and pull tight, and weave in ends.

Abbreviations:

K knit

K2tog Knit two together

Sts Stitches

Rnd(s) Round(s)

C2B Slip 2 sts and hold them in back of work; knit 2; knit the two sts from cable needle

C2F Slip 2 sts and hold them in front of work; knit 2; knit the two sts from cable needle

C2B1 Slip 2 sts and hold them in back of work; knit 1; knit the two sts from cable needle

LT Insert the right needle into the second st on the left hand needle in the back and knit it but do not take it off; knit the first st on the left hand needle like normal; slip both sts off the needle (Left Twist made)

 


It's Random

See the little random number generator over to the right? It's been there for a few days. Anyway, I put it on my blog so it would be handy. I set it for a default minimum of 6, and a maximum of 20, and I'm using it to knit a version of the ribbed scarf, where I knit two & purl two for a number of rows, then hit the random number generator and do purl two, knit two for a number of rows, and so on. It makes knit two, purl too a shade more interesting, but still mindless. I like it.

The scarf I'm working on is good in ribbing, because it's handpainted, and it's mohair :) I won it in a NETA drawing, so it's extra-special! And my sister helped me design it, and that's perfect. Here it is so far:

Mohair

You too can use a random number generator to make a scarf; use any number for high and low setting you like, or use mine. Mine is from random.org, and you can get one too, it's free. Or use the one on their website. I used 32 stitches and size 9 (5.5 mm) needles, because the mohair is a bulky weight and size 9 is the biggest needles I had that aren't circular. Go nuts :)

 

Edit: The yarn in question is from Dorchester Farms of Dorchester, MA; it's hand painted brushed mohair, of indeterminate color, gold/burgundy/periwinkle. It has 231 yards in 4.2 ounces.


My Hands Are Cold.....

..... because I have no mittens. Well, I *have* mittens. Lots of them. Very nice ones! But they are in the house in Appleton, and I am not. So since I need mittens, and since the Clue #2 of the mystery socks doesn't come out til Friday, I figured I'd start a pair of mittens.

I'm using some luscious yarn from Good Karma Farm that I received for Christmas, in my favorite color, Caribbean Twilight. It's so pretty! I love it. I'm using size four needles. The cuff looks funny, but don't worry, be happy. It all evens out. 

Mittens

A few years ago I made a bunch of these mittens out of Maine wool, and they were a hit. I started out using a pattern, but here and there I tweaked it enough that I thought I should write it down, so I did. Enjoy and keep your fingers warm!

 

Beth's Awesome Mitten Pattern

Materials: 4  oz. Good Karma Farm 60% wool, 40% alpaca yarn

Size 4 double pointed needles

Gauge: 6 stitches = 1 inch

Right Mitten:

Cast on 40 sts. Work 6 rounds stockinette stitch. Work K2, P2 for 3 1/2". Increase 4 sts in last round to 44 sts. Knit 4 rounds even. 

Increase for thumb:

Rnd. 1:  Inc. in first stitch, K1, inc in next stitch, place marker, (thumb gore sts marked off), knit to end of round.

Knit 2 rounds even.

Continue, increasing one st in first and last st in thumb gore every 3rd round until there are 13 sts. in the thumb gore. 

Knit 2 rnds even. Slip sts to a piece of yarn to hold them. 

Cast on 3 sts at beginning of next round and continue working in stockinette st until 6 inches above ribbing, or 1" less than total desired length of mitten.

Decrease for top:

First dec rnd:  (K2, k2tog) around. 

Knit 3 rnds even.

Second dec rnd: (K1, k2tog) around.

Knit 3 rnds even.

Third dec rnd: K2tog around. 

Break yarn, leaving a long tail. Draw tail through all sts and pull the sts together. Weave in tail on inside. 

Thumb:

Slip thumb gore sts onto two dpns. With a 3rd needle pick up and k 3 sts over the sts cast on over the thumb gore opening. (16 sts for thumb). 

On first round of knitting, redistribute sts evenly on three needles (5, 5, and 6).

Knit around until thumb measures 2" above cast on sts. Dec 1 st in last round (15 sts).

Dec for top of thumb

Next rnd: (K1, k2tog) around. 

Knit one round even.

Next rnd: K2tog around. Finish as for top of mitten.

Left Mitten:

Work the same as for Right Mitten except when you increase  for the thumb gusset, do as follows:

Rnd. 1:  Work to last three sts, place marker, inc in first stitch, K1, inc in next stitch (thumb gore sts marked off).

Finishing:

Weave in ends. Block, if desired. 



Half of My Edna Order Is Done, and Lacy Scarf

Pity, really.

This is the blackberry Edna that I loved using:

Catseye

It's the Cat's Eye scarf from A Fine Fleece, unblocked and ends dangling, but even in this state, I love it. I didn't follow the pattern exactly; it's supposed to be all garter stitch, but I liked the lace border better in stockinette. 

This is the second half of my Edna order, in Raspberry Sherbet Sparkle:

Scarf1

I love this color. I loved the Blackberry too, the way you love a brother, but this .... it makes me weak in the knees.

I'm making the Lacey Scarf from Unique One, from several years ago. It was a store sample of Douceur et Soie, and one ball made a little scarf. Here's the pattern:

LACY SCARF

Materials: 1 skein Douceur et Soie, or Edna from Good Karma Farm, or any fingering weight, about 225 - 500 yards

size 6 needles, or whatever gives you a lacy fabric

 Gauge: I don't remember what the gauge was for Douceur et Soie, but it doesn't really matter. For you purists out there, I'm getting 6 sts per inch measured over stockinette stitch using Edna. 

Finished measurement: 8 inches wide x 48 inches long or whatever length you want it

Directions: Cast on 52 stitches. Work in lace pattern until you have just enough yarn to bind off with (if possible, end with row 8 of the lace pattern). Bind off loosely knitwise.

 This will make a scarf that is scalloped on one end and flat across the bound off end. To make both ends scalloped, knit two halves and graft them together, or do a three-needle bind off, if you don't mind the little seam-like thing on the back of your neck.

Lace pattern: 

Row 1: Slip 1 as  if to knit, *yo, k3, sl1, k2tog, psso, k3, yo, k1; repeat from * to last st, k1. (the first and last stitches are selvage stitches)

Row 2 and every even-numbered row: Slip 1, purl across.

Row 3: Slip 1 as  if to knit, *k1, yo, k2, sl1, k2tog, psso, k2, yo, k2; repeat from * to last st, k1. 

Row 5: Slip 1 as  if to knit, *k2, yo, k1, sl1, k2tog, psso, k1, yo, k3; repeat from * to last st, k1. 

Row 7: Slip 1 as  if to knit, *k3, yo, sl1, k2tog, psso, yo, k4; repeat from * to last st, k1. 

Row 8: Slip 1, purl across.

 

Repeat rows 1 through 8 for Lace pattern.

 


Don't Forget the Felines!

You know how it is, you get busy during the holidays. You are busy knitting wonderful gifts, probably. It is easy to forget to knit something for the furry ones in your life too! I know I have realized at the last minute that I haven't remembered the holiday gifts for people's kitties ..... and dashed out at the last minute to gather them. It is amazing how expensive cat toys seem to be, when you have to buy all the cat toys for the 14 cats in your family and friends circle, all at once! 

So, to forestall that problem, I am jumping in NOW to give you my little catnip mouse toy pattern that is quick and easy to knit. It only takes about 20 minutes to make one. You can make 3 of them during the hiatus between Turkey Dinner and Post-Turkey-Dinner Pie. I will post a picture of a completed mouse as soon as I can.

Here's the pattern:

CATNIP MOUSE CAT TOY

Yarn: Lush (50% wool/50% angora) by Classic Elite. I think one skein will make around 10 to 12 mice, maybe more. You could use any worsted weight yarn, but cats like angora blends. I also think cats might be color blind, so make the colors YOU like best :)

Needles: size 4 double pointed needles.

Cast on 21 sts, leaving a long tail to sew up with later (and also it makes the mouse’s tail, too). Join into a circle and knit 16 rounds. 

Begin decreases for head: 

Next round: knit 2, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit to last 4 sts in the round, knit 2 together, knit 2. 

Repeat this decrease round until there are 7 sts left. Next round: knit 2 together  three times, knit one. Cut yarn, leaving a long tail which you then thread onto a darning needle and pull through the remaining 4 sts. Pull them up tight, and then pull this yarn to the inside, to make little loops for ears at the beginning of the decrease rounds, tacking each loop in place. (You can just secure this on the inside and leave the ears off if you don’t want to bother with the ears. My cat likes to pull at the ears with her teeth. It gives her something to do.)

Thread the cast-on tail onto a darning needle and run it in and out around the cast on edge, making a mini drawstring bag sort of thing. Fill the mouse with catnip or, if you prefer, fiberfill stuffing (some cats are on a no-catnip diet, having abused the substance at some point in life, no doubt.) Pull on the cast-on tail, closing the drawstring tight; tack in place several times to secure the opening, making it as tightly closed as possible and leaving the tail outside. Tie a little knot  about half an inch from the end of the tail so you’ll have something to hold onto as you dangle the little critter in front of the cat. Or you may want to just throw it on the floor and stand back. 


Tis the Season....

Yeah, I know. The winter holidays are not for another three and a half months. BUT... now is the time to start knitting fun holiday stuff, so you have it already made for decorating for the Big Day. I ran across this free pattern a couple days ago, and these miniature sweatures are so darn cute, I wanted to start making them right away. I haven't started making them yet, but I think they are awfully cute:


12ornaments

The very best bit is that the patterns for these little darlings is FREE FREE FREE from Berroco.com!!! It's just like a holiday gift! Click HERE to go get the pattern!

..... walks off humming Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow.....


A Little Gift for the Kitties

Need a little gift for a special kitty in your life? Here is my little Christmas gift to all of you... a pattern for a small catnip mouse that you can knit for that feline someone whom you love! It only takes about 20 minutes to knit one, so you have plenty of time to knit one for your kitty by Christmas!

I (of course) do not have a picture of this catnip delight, but I will add a picture when I get it. For the moment, imagine a rather fat Brown 'N Serve sausage, pointed on one end (for the nose), with a tail and two loops of yarn for ears. :D



CATNIP MOUSE CAT TOY

Yarn: Lush (50% wool/50% angora) by Classic Elite. I think one skein will make around 10 to 12 mice, maybe more. You could use any worsted weight yarn, but cats like angora blends.

Needles: size 4 double pointed needles.

Cast on 21 sts, leaving a long tail to sew up with later (and also it makes the mouse’s tail, too). Join into a circle and knit 16 rounds.

Begin decreases for head:

Next round: knit 2, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit to last 4 sts in the round, knit 2 together, knit 2.

Repeat this decrease round until there are 7 sts left. Next round: knit 2 together three times, knit one. Cut yarn, leaving a long tail which you then thread onto a darning needle and pull through the remaining 4 sts. Pull them up tight, and then pull this yarn to the inside, to make little loops for ears at the beginning of the decrease rounds, tacking each loop in place. (You can just secure this on the inside and leave the ears off if you don’t want to bother with the ears. My cat likes to pull at the ears with her teeth. It gives her something to do.)

Thread the cast-on tail onto a darning needle and run it in and out around the cast on edge, making a mini drawstring bag sort of thing. Fill the mouse with catnip or, if you prefer, fiberfill stuffing (some cats are on a no-catnip diet, having abused the substance at some point in life, no doubt.) Pull on the cast-on tail, closing the drawstring tight; tack in place several times to secure the opening, making it as tightly closed as possible and leaving the tail outside. Tie a little knot about half an inch from the end of the tail so you’ll have something to hold onto as you dangle the little critter in front of the cat. Or you may want to just throw it on the floor and stand back.


Google Page Creator

I love new toys. Google can always be counted on to provide them for me (God bless 'em!). So a couple months ago (maybe more, maybe less) when I heard about the new fun thing Google was offering I signed up for the beta. If you are interested, you can take a look (click here). Be forewarned that it is only available for PC's. Mac owners will have to wait a while. And don't flame me; I write this blog everyday on my cute lil' iBook running Mac OS X. I just happen to have a few computers around the house, including some PC's.

Google's new toy is called "Google Page Creator" and it will bring web page creation to the masses, apparently for free. The free part sounds a little too good to be true, so I don't know how long that will last, but for now it is great. They're only inviting a few people at a time (people who have gmail accounts) to come use the Google page creator, but eventually it will be available for anyone to use -- at least, that's the idea. I feel very lucky that I was invited to play with this fun new toy early on.

Basically, all you have to do is type and click buttons, and voila! A web page springs to life! I spent a little while this morning playing around with it. Funny, how fate provides with what you need just when you need it, sometimes. Just yesterday I pored over the problem of the free patterns here on my blog; when I only had two or three free patterns, readers could just click on the "Free Patterns" category link in the left sidebar, and go to the patterns. It was easy to scroll down a little to browse the two or three patterns. Now that I have six free patterns, it's not as happy an experience. Eventually, I will have even more free patterns here. I wanted to create a separate page or set of pages, listing the patterns by title so that visitors could simply click on the pattern they wanted and go to it, without having to scroll forever through other stuff they don't want.

Then, today in my morning email was the invite from Google Page Creator, opening a door to solve my problem. So here it is: the new & improved Unique One Free Patterns web site. (Enjoy!!)


Ribbed Leaves Lace Scarf

This pattern has been available on the Unique One website for a couple of months, in the "Current Newsletter" section. I thought I'd move it over here and offer it to my blog readers who may or may not already read the Unique One newsletter on line or get a hard copy of it via the mail.

I like this little scarf because it is reversible -- looks the same on both sides -- and it was fun yet relatively easy to knit. I say "relatively easy", because although it requires yarn overs and a couple slightly funky decrease methods, and it looks like it has a lot of rows in the pattern repeat, you really only have to remember two of the rows in the pattern. Just repeat stuff a lot. And every other row is simple knit one, purl one ribbing. It took me a couple pattern repeats to get the flow going, but once I "got it", everything was honeycakes and mead from then on out. I hope you have as much fun knitting it as I did! I'd like to try it in the new merino lace yarn that Victoria just ordered from Skacel (arriving mid-May), or oooh, ooooh, ooooh, that hand-dyed laceweight silk, "Andrea", from Schaefer, that I have sitting right here...... Ooops. Not enough time. But I will put it on my list!


Ribbedleafscarf

RIBBED LEAVES ALPACA SCARF

Materials: 3 skeins Frogtree Alpaca fingering weight yarn; size 6 needles

Finished size: 72 inches long x 7.5 inches wide

Directions:

Cast on 66 sts. Work in Ribbed Leaves pattern as follows.

Rows 1, 3,5, & 7(RS): *K1, P1, yo twice, [K1, P1] twice, K1, R2dec, [P1, K1] 5 times, P1; repeat from * to end.

Row 2 & all WS rows: work in K1, P1 rib, working double yo’s as 2 stitches.

Rows 9, 11, 13, & 15: *[K1, P1] 6 times, L2dec, [K1, P1] twice, K1, yo twice, P1; repeat from * to end.

Row 16: work as Row 2.

Repeat these 16 rows for Ribbed Leaves pattern.

Work in pattern until scarf measures 72 inches long or desired length. Bind off loosely.

Abbreviations used:

K = knit

P = purl

yo = yarn over (wrap the yarn around the needle once, treat this wrapped yarn as a stitch in the next row)

R2dec = slip purl stitch to right hand needle, slip knit stitch to cable needle and hold in front, slip next purl stitch to right hand needle, slip knit stitch from cable needle back to left hand needle, slip 2 purl stitches back to left hand needle, purl 2 together, knit 2 together.

L2dec = with yarn in back, slip knit stitch to right hand needle knitwise, slip purl stitch to cable needle and hold in back, slip next knit stitch to right hand needle knitwise, slip purl stitch from cable needle back to left hand needle, leaving 2 knit stitches on right hand needle, knit these two together through the back loops, purl next 2 stitches on left hand needle together.


Bobble-Edged Hat pattern

Bobble-Edged Hat

This hat pattern was included in the Unique One Fall Newsletter and, since the next newsletter will be coming out in a month or so with an all-new wicked cunnin' scarf pattern (which I LOVE, if I must say so myself, wait til you see this one) -- I thought I'd put the Bobble Hat pattern here on my blog for safekeeping, for my loyal readers, for eternity or for as long as the internet lasts. Enjoy!

Bobblehat_2

Bobble-Edged Hat

Materials: 2 balls Paintbox yarn from Knit One Crochet Too (a worsted weight single ply wool which has 100 yards in a 50-gram ball; you actually only need about 150 yards for the hat); size 7 16" circular needles and size 7 double pointed needles; tapestry needle to weave in ends.

Size: fits average-sized woman's head

Special Abbreviation: MB (Make Bobble): knit into front and back of next stitch twice (4sts). Turn, P4. Turn, K4. Turn, P2tog twice. Turn, k2tog through the back loops.

Cast on 96 sts using size 7 16-inch circular needle. Join and work bobble edging as follows: Row 1: Purl. Bobble Round: K2, *MB, K5; rep from *, end last rep MB, K3.

(Purl a round, knit a round) twice (2 garter ridges).

Work in K2, P2 rib for one inch.

Purl 3 rounds.

Work textured rib pattern as follows: Round 1: (K5, P1) around. Round 2: P1, (K3, P3) around, end K3, P2. Round 3: P2, (K1, P5) around, end K1, P3. Repeat these three rounds for pattern. Work in textured rib pattern for 3 1/2 inches.

Purl 3 rounds.

Continue in stockinette stitch and work decreases as follows:

Round 1: (K6, K2tog) around.

Round 2 and all even rows: Knit.

Round 3: (K5, K2tog) around.

Round 5: (K4, K2tog) around.

Round 7: (K3, K2tog) around.

Round 9: (K2, K2tog) around.

Round 11: (K1, K2tog) around.

Round 12: Knit.

Next Rounds: K2tog around until 6 sts are left. Cut yarn, pull tail through remaining sts, pull tight. Weave in ends.


Jayne Hat Pics & Pattern!

Here, as promised, is a picture of the Unique One Firefly Gang attending the Serenity movie in their Jayne Hats:
Jaynehat
From L to R: Tracy, Stacy, Grace & Victoria. Y'all look WUNNERFUL in yer Jayne Hats!!

And Tracy was so gracious as to write out the pattern for her Jayne Hat, mostly because I begged and whined unceasingly for her to do so, and she is allowing me to post it here. Thanks, Tracy!!! Please leave her a comment of appreciation here on this post, and I'll make sure she reads it. And go see the Serenity movie! Here is her pattern:



Jayne Cobb's mom made him this cunnin' hat. It's not beautiful, but it does say something about the wearer! This pattern closely matches the original hat as seen in Firefly episode "The Message."

Lambs Pride Bulky in A. Autumn Harvest, B. Sunburst Gold, and C. Rust

Size 10.5 needles--16" circulars and double points

Basic hat is knit first, then stitches are picked up around the edge for the earflaps. This fits a 22" head and would easily stretch to a 23" head.

CO 60 loosely in A. Autumn Harvest on circular needles; join, being careful not to twist.

Place a stitch marker at the beginning of the round, k 20 stitches, place a second marker, *k1, p1* rib for the rest of the round. Repeat this pattern for five rounds.

The 20 K stitches will be the forehead of the hat.

Change to K each round and continue with A. Autumn Harvest for a total of four inches (edge to end, including the ribbed section).

Cut A. Autumn Harvest and join B. Sunburst Gold. K around for four inches (total hat length, 8")

K2tog for two rounds, switching to dp when there are not enough stitches to go around the circular needles. Cut 12" tail, pull through the stitches and weave in on the inside of the hat.

Earflap:

Hold hat open side up. Pick up 16 stitches with C. Rust starting at the edge of the K stitches (pick up in the ribbing).

St st for three inches (k one row, p one row); end after a P row.

Do short row: K 13, sl 1, TURN WORK AROUND, bring yarn forward, p 13, sl 1, TURN WORK AROUND, k to end of row.

St st for two inches; end after a P row.

Decreases:
K until there are 3 st left, k2tog, k 1
P until there are 3 st left, p2tog, p 1
repeat these two rows until you have six stitches left on the needles. Bind off. Leave 6" tail.

Pick up 16 stitches on the other side of the hat, this time ending at the K area. Make earflap again.

Finishing:

Make pompom out of C. Rust, do not trim for evenness. Attach to top of hat. Cut a few 6" pieces of C. Rust and dangle from ends of earflaps. Flip earflaps up; the short row will help make the flaps flip up.

Roll in straw and wear pearched high on your forehead. And, go see Serenity in the theater so that Jayne will fly again!


Look, I'm Famous!

I guess you all know how I can go on and on and on about how great Alchemy Yarns is. No, I don't work for them. No, I don't get a cut of their sales. I just love them.

Back in June, at the TNNA show, Gina and Austin gave me a sample skein of Sanctuary yarn, and I whipped up a simple scarf and gave it to them. It was pretty, I must admit, but 99% of its beauty was the yarn itself. Okay, I'll take 1% credit for it being beautiful, too. Anyway, they took a picture of it and put it on their website: Click here and scroll to the bottom of the page. And you can not only see the scarf, but you can also get the pattern for it -- it's free! Hope you have as much fun making it as I did, and I hope you try some Sanctuary. I love that yarn.

Also, make SURE you check out the great picture of the Alchemy Yarn pet pig, Purl! Purl and her canine friends send off every shipment of Alchemy Yarn with their blessing. (The cookie they get from Darla, the UPS driver, may play a part in this.) Thanks for the picture, Gina & Austin!


Shopping Bag

Netbag

Going shopping this summer? Here's a handy little bag you can knit that won't take up much room in your purse, but when you stuff it full, it'll hold a LOT of stuff. It's great to take to a Farmer's Market! And you can knit one in a couple of evenings:

Net Shopping Bag

Yarn: 2 Balls Lingarn -- or 140 meters of any worsted to heavy worsted cotton/linen blend. It would also be nice in hemp, or 100% linen, all cotton, or any tough, not-very-stretchy fiber.

Needles: size 13 double pointed needles; size 13 circular needles, 16"

*Note: the bag is started on double pointed needles; switch to the circular needles when it is feasible.

Base of Bag:
Cast on 9 stitches, divided on 3 double pointed needles. Join.
Round 1: (K1, yarn over) around (18 sts).
Rounds 2, 3, & 4: Knit (on Round 2 knit into the backs of the yarn overs to close them up a bit).
Round 5: (K1, yarn over) around (36 sts.)
Rounds 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, & 11: Knit (on Round 6 knit into the backs of the yarn overs to close them up a bit).
Round 12: (K1, yarn over) around (72 sts).
Round 13: Knit.
Round 14: Purl.
Round 15: Knit.
Round 16: Purl.

Body of Bag:
Round 17: (yarn over, K2tog) around.
Round 18: (K2tog, yarn over) around.
Repeat rows 17 & 18 until bag measures 12" from last purl row. You can make it longer or shorter at this point. Just remember to buy more yarn if you want to make the bag longer!

Bag Top & Handles
Knit two rounds, knitting into the backs of the previous row's yarn overs to close them.
Next round: Knit 9, bind off 18, knit 18, bind off 18, knit 9.
Next round: Knit 9, cast on 40 (over the space where you bound off 18 in the last row), knit 18, cast on 40 (over the space where you bound off 18 in the last row), knit 9. (116 sts) *You could cast on more here if you want longer handles. If you have extra yarn!!
Knit one round. Bind off all stitches.

Actually, you could make this bag big enough to carry laundry or beach stuff in, if you wanted. Just make the base larger (you would knit 12 more rounds plain after Round 12, increase by yarn-overing every other stitch, knit another 24 rounds, then do the increase round again -- that would make it plenty big; you could stop anywhere in between, of course); then knit a much higher body, maybe 24 inches?

Have fun knitting the bag! Go shopping!

Netbag2


Rainy Day Scarf

Melenascarf

It's another rainy day.

I knit this scarf way back in January & February. I love the yarn; it's a wool/silk blend from The Purled Llama . The yarn is called "Melena" and the color is called "Beth" (yes, it's named after me!)

I had the scarf on display at the NETA knit and spin weekend in February, and several people asked for the pattern to knit it. I assured them I'd write down the pattern, but I never did get around to it. But this morning the rain reminded me of the scarf's wavy pattern stitch, so I finally wrote down the pattern. And here 'tis:


Rainy Day Scarf

1 skein “Melena” or a couple hundred yards of any wool/silk heavy worsted weight yarn*(see note below)
size 5.5 mm (US size 9) needles
tapestry needle

Finished measurements: 55 inches long, 4 inches wide (unblocked).


Cast on 28 sts.

Work in Wavy Pattern
Rows 1 - 4: (K 2, P 2) 7 times.
Row 5 & 7: P 1, (K 2, P 2) 6 times, K 2, P 1.
Row 6 & 8: K1, P 2, (K 2, P 2) 6 time, K 1
Rows 9 - 12: (P 2, K 2) 7 times
Row 13 & 15: K 1, (P 2, K 2) 6 times, P 2, K 1.
Row 14 & 16: P 1, K 2, (P 2, K 2) 6 times, P 1.
Rows 17 - 20: (K 2, P 2) 7 times
Rows 21 & 23: K 1, (P 2, K 2) 6 times, P 2, K 1.
Rows 22 & 24: P 1, K 2, (P 2, K 2) 6 times, P 1.
Rows 25 -28: (P 2, K 2) 7 times
Rows 29 & 31: P 1, (K 2, P 2) 6 times, K 2, P 1.
Rows 30 & 32: K1, P 2, (K 2, P 2), K 1


Repeat these 32 rows until you rund out of yarn; bind off; weave in ends.

*note: The Wavy Pattern could be adapted to suit any gauge yarn; it is a multiple of 4 sts/32rows. Just increase or decrease the number of times the K 2, P 2 (or P 2, K 2) is repeated in the middle. Actually, I guess you could even use it to make a baby blanket or an afghan. Or a pillow. Hmmm.....

I hope the sun comes out soon! The silk in this Melena yarn really looks lovely in sunlight.

(thinking: I bet this scarf would also be gorgeous in Alchemy Yarn's "Synchronicity" or "Bamboo").