Stars and Stripes Hat

On September 12, 2001, I designed this Stars and Stripes hat. It was my way of doing something, anything, in the wake of what has come to be called 9/11. The original hat was on display in Unique One until my stroke, and it sold many skeins of Lamb’s Pride worsted. 

I’ll get another one knit so you can see it in color. The hat has a rolled brim which doesn’t show well in the photocopy, but you can easily substitute ribbing or a hemmed edge if you prefer.

Stars and Stripes hat image

(Download Stars & Stripes Hat.pdf (855.6K))

Stars & Stripes Hat

Yarn: Lamb’s Pride Worsted, or any American worsted weight yarn in 100 gram skeins; 1 skein each of navy, red, and white

Needles: 16” circular needle, sizes US5/3.75mm and US7/4.50mm; double pointed needles size US7/4.50mm

Gauge: 5 sts per inch

*This pattern makes a size medium hat to fit about a 22” head; to make a smaller size, use needles sizes US4/3.50mm &US6/4.00mm, or use a thinner yarn; to make a larger size, use needles US6/4.00mm & US8./5.00, or use a thicker yarn.

Directions: With navy yarn and smaller circular needles, cast on 100 sts. Join and place marker to show end of round. Knit every round until it measures 1 ¼”. Switch to larger circular needles and continue with navy for 2 rounds. 

Work striped band as follows: knit one round and purl one round with white; with red, knit one round, purl one round, knit one round, and purl one round. With white, knit one round and purl one round. 

With navy, knit two rounds.

Work star pattern as follows: 

Round 1: Knit 7 navy, *knit 1 white, knit 5 navy, knit 1 white, knit 13 navy*, repeat between *’s ending knit 6 navy.

Round 2: Knit 7 navy, *knit 2 white, knit 3 navy, knit 2 white, knit 13 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 6 navy.

Round 3: Knit 8 navy, *knit 2 white, knit 1 navy, knit 2 white, knit 15 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 7 navy.

Round 4: Knit 8 navy, *knit 5 white, knit 15 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 7 navy.

Round 5: Knit 9 navy, *knit 3 white, knit 17 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 8 navy.

Round 6: Repeat Round 5.

Round 7: Knit 7 navy, *knit 7 white, knit 13 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 6 navy.

Round 8: Knit 6 navy, *knit 9 white, knit 11 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 5 navy.

Round 9: Knit 9 navy, *knit 3 white, knit 17 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 8 navy.

Round 10: Knit 10 navy, *knit 1 white, knit 19 navy*, repeat between *’s around, ending knit 9 navy.

Round 11: Repeat Round 10.

Knit two rounds in navy. Work the striped band again. Knit 7 rounds in navy.

Begin decreases for top as follows, continuing with navy, switching to double pointed needles when there are too few stitches remaining to work comfortably on the circular needle:

Round 1: *Knit 8, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 2 and all even numbered rounds: Knit around.

Round 3: *Knit 7, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 5: *Knit 6, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 7: *Knit 5, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 9: *Knit 4, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 11: *Knit 3, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 13: *Knit 2, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 15: *Knit 1, knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Round 17: *Knit 2 together*, repeat between *’s around.

Cut yarn, leaving a 6” tail. Pull yarn through remaining stitches and pull them together. Weave in ends on the inside of the hat.

(Download Stars & Stripes Hat.pdf (855.6K))

Photocopy of the original pattern:

StarsStripes


Busy Fingerless Mitts

What have you been doing lately? I've been busy. That's me, busy little bee.

Bee-3298375_640

Image by Capri23auto from Pixabay

I started  fiddling around with this fingerless mitten design, and finally voilá! It's done!

Download Busy Fingerless Mitts.pdf (798.4K)

IMG_0466

Busy Fingerless Mitts 

Materials:

Fingering weight yarn, 50g MC and 20g CC. Scraps of sock yarn are good for this. 

Size 2 double-pointed needles 

Gauge: 36 sts and 38 rounds = 4” measured over stranded knitting

Abbreviations: CC=contrast color; fbf=knit in the front, the back, and the front of one stitch, thus making 3 sts out of one; k=knit; MC=main color; p=purl; psso=pass slipped stitch over; rep=repeat; yo=yarn over .

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Directions:

Using MC, cast on 60 sts. Knit 1 round. Work Eyelet Mock Cable Ribbing for about 2” (or desired length), ending with Round 2 of Eyelet Mock Cable Ribbing pattern. 

Knit 1 round, increasing 1 stitch. (61 sts) 

Purl 1 round. 

Work 10 rounds of Chart Pattern for Right or Left hand; on Round 11, work 27 stitches of chart for Left Hand OR work 33 stitches of chart for Right Hand, then knit fbf with CC making three stitches, and complete the round. This is Round 1 of the Thumb insertion. Continue working Rounds 12 - 41 of hand while working Rounds 2-21 of Thumb. When Thumb is complete, put the Thumb sts on a stitch holder or piece of yarn, cast on 1 stitch with CC, and continue the chart. 

When chart is finished, cut CC. Knit 1 round, decreasing 1 stitch at end of round (60 sts). Purl 1 round. 

Work 6 rounds of Eyelet Mock Cable Ribbing pattern. Bind off all sts in pattern. 

Finish Thumb: 

Put Thumb sts on needles and pick up 3 stitches over thumb using MC. Knit a round and purl a round. Work 6 rounds of k2, p2 ribbing. Bind off. 

Weave in ends and block. 

Eyelet Mock Cable Ribbing: 

Round 1: *slip 1, k2, psso , p2; rep from * to end. (Note: Round 1 has fewer stitches than the other rounds. It’s okay.)

Round 2*k1, yo, k1, p2; rep from * to end. 

Round 3: *k3, p2; rep from * to end. 

Round 4: *k3, p2; rep from * to end. 

Repeat Rounds 1 – 4 for pattern. 

 

Left Hand Chart: 

LeftHandChart

 

Right Hand Chart: 

RightHandChart

Thumb Chart:

Fingerless Mitten thumb - Stitch Fiddle

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Download Busy Fingerless Mitts.pdf (798.4K)


Weird

I just knit the weirdest scarf that I have ever knit.

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The yarn I had was two hard balls of Berroco Boho, a self-striping tape yarn in nylon, cotton and  rayon, now discontinued. One day, I found  the pattern: it was on a little piece of paper handed out to the knitters on one of the Unique One knitting nights by one of the knitters. She didn't remember where it was from, but she gave all of us a copy when we asked her about the weird scarves she was making.

The scarf she was knitting was knit in a tube on double pointed needles, all knit in stockinette stitch. It looked wider and shorter than I thought it should be -- until she got to the last row. That is where the magic happened. She dropped every other stitch, knit a round, and bound off! Then she proceeded to pull and push and tweak the stitches until every stitch was dropped down to the end, and the scarf became the right length and looked wonderful. Amazing!

I had forgotten about it until rooting around in my patterns one day, I found that slip of paper, and I thought it might be nice for a summer scarf in Boho which I was trying to find something to do with (thus the rooting around.)

Being a sensible ex-yarn shop owner, I didn't want to put a pattern on my blog that had a copyright, so I tried to find if it was on the internet somewhere, but I couldn't find it anywhere. There are lots of dropped stitch patterns on Ravelry, but none was the same as this one.

Have fun! Stay weird!

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Download Drop Stitch Scarf.pdf (127.2K)

Drop Stitch Scarf

Materials: 200 yards worsted weight yarn; size 8 double pointed needles, OR circular needles of your choice to knit with two circulars or Magic Loop

Gauge isn’t important for this project.

Size: About 4" by 6', but mine was knit on a particularly slick nylon blend. If you use wool, it'll be a bit wider and probably a foot shorter.

Directions:

Cast on 24 stitches, 8 stitches per 3 needles.

Row 1: Knit.

Row 2: Increase 1 in every stitch. (48 stitches, 16 sts per needle)

Continue to knit in the round until scarf measures 17”-20” or however long you want (I knit to about 25”). It will be about 2-3 times longer than this when you finish.

Fun row: *Knit 1, then drop 1 stitch* around. (Back to 24 stitches, 8 stitches per 3 needles).

Knit 1 row. Bind off all sts.

Pull the scarf until all the dropped stitches come to the opposite end. Add fringe if you want.

Fun to do! Better not to use knobby or fuzzy yarn as it makes it harder to pull the dropped stitches out.


Helicopter Hat

You may remember this Navajo plied yarn that I was proud to make since my stroke:

NavajoPliedYarn

I wanted to knit it up to see what it looked like, so I started knitting a hat with it. I estimated that it was worsted weight, so I cast on 100 stitches and used size 4 double pointed needles. I changed to size 5 needles and stockinette stitch and just kept knitting. It was coming out pretty good, not as good as my pre-stroke 3 ply, but it was pretty good.

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So after about 4 inches I started to run out of yarn, which I expected. What to do, what to do ... then I thought about a post on Winwick Mum's blog about how she was enjoying knitting a sock with helical knitting. At the time I thought, big whoop. I tried helical knitting and it drove me crazy, so I immediately dropped the idea.

As I knit my hat though, I really didn't want to do any sort of stranded knitting because I've got another thing coming up that uses a lot of it, and I thought stripes would be nice if they were just little ones, though the jog drives me crazy; and suddenly I wanted to try helical knitting again.

I used a link from Winwick Mum's post and found it to be very easy, fun, and enjoyable! See for yourself; it's Jen of Arnall-Culliford Knitting's tutorial.

Helical knitting is a great way to incorporate the pesky bits of yarn (especially homespun yarn that you don't have quite enough to do anything with, yet don't want to throw away or make another scrap shawl). The little one row stripes are a great way to blend colors together too. It really is delightful.

So why did I name my pattern Helicopter Hat? Because Helical Hat is hard to say, and the first thing that people would wonder is, what the heck is that? Helicopter is easier, and the way the colors just whup, whup, whup around as you go along seemed appropriate. Also I might be going a little insane.

Anyway. Here is my really simple Helicopter Hat.

Download Helicopter Hat.pdf (177.6K)

IMG_0451

Helicopter Hat

Materials:

200 yards worsted weight yarn (can use scraps)

Size US4 (3.50mm) and US5 (3.75mm) double pointed needles 

Gauge: 5 sts and 7 rows per inch

Size: Adult (fits both me and my husband)

Directions:

Using size 4 needles, cast on 100 sts. Work k2, p2 ribbing for 10 rows. Switch to size 5  to stockinette stitch until total length is 8 inches. (At any time during this stockinette section you can insert stripes using the helical knitting technique.)

Decrease for top:

Round 1: *knit 8, k2tog* around

Round 2: knit 

Round 3: *knit 7, k2tog* around

Round 4: knit 

Round 5: *knit 6, k2tog* around

Round 6: knit 

Round 7: *knit 5, k2tog* around

Round 8: knit

Round 9: *knit 4, k2tog* around

Round 10: *knit 3, k2tog* around

Round 11: *knit 2, k2tog* around

Round 12: *knit 1, k2tog* around

Round 13: *k2tog* around

Cut yarn, pull through the 10 stitches left and pull tight. Weave in ends.

Download Helicopter Hat.pdf (177.6K)




Isaac Evans Anchor & Wave Socks

This pattern has been around for a while, in a hard copy. I designed it for one of the Isaac Evans Knitting Cruises. I knit the sample in cotton fingering yarn, for a summer cruise, but it could easily work in wool too.

This sock has a turned down cuff and is knit as a short summer sock, but you can make it a bit taller if you want.

Isaac Evans Anchor & Wave Socks

Download Isaac Evans Anchor & Wave Socks.pdf (214.0K)

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Materials: Sock yarn/fingering yarn, 100g Main Color; 25g Contrast Color; US size 2 (2.75mm) double pointed needles OR 2 circulars OR a long circular, as per your preference; tapestry needle

Size: Women’s medium. If larger or smaller sizes are required, the best thing to do is to knit with a size larger or smaller needle OR after the Anchor & Waves cuff is completed, increase or decrease the number of stitches to your favorite “sock”number of stitches. Since the foot is just a plain sock, you can use your favorite heel and toe too.

Cuff: With Contrast Color, cast on 128 stitches and divide them evenly on 4 needles (this may be changed for circular needles). This large number of stitches makes the cuff lie flat, don’t worry. Join, being careful not to twist. 

Next round: K2tog around (64 sts). 

Change to Main Color and knit 3 rounds. Work 4 rows of Wave Chart (below) with Main Color and Contrast Color. Do not cut yarn. With Main Color, knit 3 rounds. Work 12 rows of Anchor Chart (below) with Main Color and Contrast Color. Cut Contrast color. With Main Color only, knit 2 rounds, then purl 1 round (makes a turning ridge). Knit 1 round, decreasing 4 sts evenly.

Turn work inside out and continue in k2, p2 ribbing for 2”. Work in stockinette stitch (knit every round) until work measures ½” longer than Anchor & Waves cuff, measured from turning ridge (or to desired length of leg). End 16 sts from end of round. Slip first 16 sts of round onto this needle. Heel flap is worked back and forth on this needle (32 sts in heel flap.)

Heel Flap: Repeat the following 2 rows for a total of 32 rows:

Row 1: *slip 1, knit 1*, repeat between *’s to end of row.

Row 2: Slip 1, then purl to end of row.

When you have 32 rows completed, it is time to turn the heel.

Turn Heel:

Row 1: Knit 18 stitches, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 2: Slip 1, purl 5, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 3: Slip 1, knit 6, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 4: Slip 1, purl 7, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 5: Slip 1, knit 8, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 6: Slip 1, purl 9, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 7: Slip 1, knit 10, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 8: Slip 1, purl 11, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 9: Slip 1, knit 12, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 10: Slip 1, purl 13, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 11: Slip 1, knit 14, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 12: Slip 1, purl 15, p2tog, p1, turn.

Row 13: Slip 1, knit 16, ssk, k1, turn.

Row 14: Purl 17, p2tog, turn.

Row 15: Knit across all 18 sts.

Heel Gusset: 

With right side facing, pick up 16 sts along left edge of heel flap (needle 1). Knit across next 32 sts (Needles 2 & 3). Pick up 16 sts along the edge of heel flap, and with the same needle knit across 9 of the heel flap sts (Needle 4). There are now 25 sts on needles 1 and 4, and 16 sts on needles 2 and 3 (total of 82 sts). Work Heel Gusset as follows:

Round 1: Knit to last 3 sts on Needle 1, k2tog, k1; knit across all sts on Needles 2 and 3; on Needle 4, k1, ssk, knit to end of round. 

Round 2: Knit around.

Repeat these two rounds until there are 60 sts left. Work even in stockinette stitch until 1 ¾” from total desired length of foot.

Toe: Work toe decreases as follows:

Round 1: Knit to last 3 sts on Needle 1, k2tog, k1; on Needle 2, k1, ssk, knit to end of needle; on Needle 3, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1; on Needle 4, k1, ssk, knit to end of round.

Round 2: Knit around.

Work Rounds 1 and 2 until there are 24 sts left. Then repeat Round 1 only until there are 16 sts left. Knit across Needle 1. Slip all the sts from Needle 4 onto Needle 1; slip sts from Needle 3 onto needle 2. Stitches are now equally divided onto two needles, each having 8 sts.Use Kitchener Stitch or other method of your choice to weave the toe together. Weave in all ends. Turn down cuff so anchor & wave pattern shows.

NumberedCharts

Abbreviations:

K=knit 

P=purl

k2tog=knit two together

Ssk=slip1, slip1, knit sts together through the back loop

Download Isaac Evans Anchor & Wave Socks.pdf (214.0K)


Blossoms & Buds Hat

It's Spring! Smell the fresh air!

Depth-of-field-photography-of-tulip-flowers-1076607

I made a new hat that uses nupps and something that I call a "bud stitch" from a Japanese knitting stitch book. I hope you like it!

Blossoms & Buds  Hat

IMG_0294

Materials:

Swans Island Washable Wool sport weight, 1 skein (360 yards/100g)

16 inch circular & double pointed needles US 1.5 / 2.5mm needle

Gauge: 25.33 sts and 38.5 rounds = 4"/10cm

Directions:

Cast on 128 sts.

Work ribbing for 1.5" as follows:

Round 1: *K 1, p 3* around

Round 2: *K1, p1* around

Knit a round and inc 8 in last row (136 sts)

Purl a round, knit a round, purl a round, knit 3 rounds.

Work 10 rounds of nupp flowers chart  (8 repeats of 17-stitch chart):

Chart - Stitch Fiddle

Tips for knitting nupps: 

https://pattern-duchess.com/knitting-estonian-nupp-stitch/

https://knotions.com/nupps-how-to-knit-tutorial/

https://pattern-duchess.com/how-to-knit-estonian-nupp-stitch/

Find the one you like and go with that! Or if you prefer, substitute a bobble stitch, or just a bead!

Knit a round, purl a round, knit a round, purl a round, knit a round and decrease 4 in last round (132 stitches). Purl 2 more rounds.

Work 14 rounds of Bud Stitch until hat measures about 8", ending with Round 7 or 14:

Bud Stitch:

Rounds 1 - 4: Purl

Round 5: *Purl 5, insert RN into center of stitch in 4th row below the next stitch and pull up a long loop; yo; insert RN into center of stitch in 4th row below of the same stitch and pull up a long loop; yo; insert RN into center of stitch in 4th row below of the same stitch and pull up a long loop (5 loops made from one stitch - keep the loops all the same height); drop the stitch on the left needle* around.

Round 6: *Purl 5, knit the 5 new loops you pulled up* around

Round 7: *Purl 5, sl 3 as if to knit, k2tog, psso one at a time,* around

Round 8 - 11: Purl

Round 12: *Purl 2, , insert RN into center of stitch in 4th row below the next stitch and pull up a long loop; yo; insert RN into center of stitch in 4th row below of the same stitch and pull up a long loop; yo; insert RN into center of stitch in 4th row below of the same stitch and pull up a long loop (5 loops made from one stitch - keep the loops all the same height); drop the stitch on the left needle, p3* around.

Round 13: *Purl 2, knit the new loops you pulled up, purl 3* around

Round 14: *Purl 2, sl 3 as if to knit, k2tog, psso one at a time, purl 3* around.

(I made the yo’s and dropping the st off bold because that was where I kept forgetting to do them, and got off in my stitch count.)

 

Purl 1 round. Knit 1 round.

Work in stockinette stitch and decrease for top changing to dpns where necessary:

Round 1: *Knit 6, yo, k3tog* around

Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit

Round 3: *Knit 5, yo, k3tog* around

Round 5: *Knit 4, yo, k3tog* around

Round 7: *Knit 3, yo, k3tog* around

Round 9: *Knit 2, yo, k3tog* around

Round 11: *Knit 1, yo, k3tog* around

Round 22: Knit, dec 1 st at end of round

Round 13: K2tog around until 11 sts remain. Cut yarn leaving an end to weave in. Pull up tight and weave end in on wrong side.

 

I added a pom pom on top, but you can finish it off as you like! This hat would do well with blocking. I didn’t block mine, but I should have. If it were a gift for someone, I would have blocked it to make it prettier.

Happy knitting!

Download Blossoms and Buds Hat_03.26.2020.pdf (240.6K)


Diagonal Rib Scarf Pattern

In which even horribly spun and Very Badly Plied yarn can become something warm and lovely!

See, I had this yarn that I had "spun" before my stroke:

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It was badly spun, thick and thin, and very horribly plied. I must have been drunk when I plied it. I mean, really:

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Anyway.

I had this ball of yarn hanging around for a long time, but I didn't know what to use it for. Then I discovered that my pattern for a Diagonal Rib Scarf had no picture at all! Wowzer. It required sport weight yarn .... hmm, my ball of hand spun yarn was anything from fingering to DK or light worsted, but mostly sport weight ... or something. Anyway, I decided it would become a diagonal rib scarf!

It is a very easy pattern, only four rows in the pattern repeat; it's the same on both sides, so it hangs straight and is very good for a scarf; and you can make it as long as the yarn lasts. Sounds perfect for a skein of hand spun yarn!

It came out great when it was done, and I only had this much after I trimmed the ends off after I wove them in:

IMG_0905

The finished scarf weighs 4.41 ounces, or 126 grams, and it is a merino/silk blend (sorry, I don't remember how much it was of each fiber). The scarf measures about 8 inches wide by 58 inches long, though if I blocked it, it would be longer. I just put it on immediately because my house is chilly.

IMG_0906

DIAGONAL RIB SCARF

Materials: 100 grams sport weight yarn
Size 8 (5 mm) straight needles
Tapestry needle
Gauge varies and really, it's only a scarf.
Pattern is a multiple of 4, plus 2.

Directions:
Cast on 42 sts. Knit 2 rows. 
Work in diagonal rib pattern until piece measures 48" or desired length.
Knit 2 rows. Bind off all sts. Add fringe, if desired. Diagonal Rib pattern: Row 1: K 1, *p2, k2, repeat from * to last st, k1. Row 2: K1, p1, *k2, p2, repeat from * to last 4 sts, k2, p1, k1. Row 3: K3, *p2, k2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p2, k1. Row 4: K2; *p2, k2, repeat from * to end. Repeat these 4 rows for pattern.
 
Stop when you run out of yarn! 

County Socks

A long time ago, when I was a young thing up in Aroostook County, men needed warm socks to work in the woods in the wood-cutting business, or on the farm, and to wear hunting. They were knit in Aran weight wool using needles that were much smaller than is usually used, making the socks practically bulletproof. At the least, they would keep out the cold.

Bulletproof

(So thick they stand up on their own!)

Fall's arrival  triggered sock knitting among the women, and the yarn they used was worsted wool which actually came from Canada (likely McCausland's Woolen Mills in Prince Edward Island) in natural off white for the foot, with a dyed color, probably red or green, for the leg. The dyed colors would show when worn, and they were more expensive and thus treasured more. The foot, which was hidden in the boot and which wore out more quickly, was knitted in the cheaper natural yarn, and was removed several times over the course of the sock's life as it wore out from wear.

The pattern was memorized and rarely written down. That's how I learned it ... but I wrote down the pattern for a friend many years ago, and it's a good thing too, because I can't remember it now. It's a men's sock pattern, knit very tightly with size four needles and heavy Aran-weight wool to make socks that are nearly bullet proof. I have knit it in one color of Bartlettyarn.

CountySocks

Materials:

2 4-ounce skeins Bartlettyarn Maine wool worsted weight (210 yards per skein) Medium Sheep Gray

Size US 4/3.5mm double pointed needles (use four needles, not five)

Tapestry needle

Gauge:

22 sts and 40 rows per 4"

Directions:

Cast on 54 sts (18 sts on 3 needles). Work *k2, p1* ribbing for 10".

Make heel flap:

Divide work so that 32 stitches are on one needle (heel needle), and 11 stitches each are on two needles.

Work double heel as follows:

Row 1: Slip 1, purl to end.

Row 2: Slip 1, *K1, sl1* to last stitch, k1.

Work rows 1 and 2 for 2.25". Repeat Row 1.

Turn heel:

Row 1: K 23 sts, k2tog, turn.

Row 2: P 15, p2tog, turn.

Row 3: K 15, k2tog, turn.

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until 16 stitches are left. End having completed  a purl row (Row 2). Knit one row.

Join work into a round again:

With heel needle, pick up 17 stitches along the edge of the heel flap (needle 1). Work k2, p1 across the instep (needle 2). Pick up 16 sts along the other side of the heel flap and knit 8 stitches from the heel needle (needle 3). (25, 22, 24 stitches on three needles, a total of 71 sts).

Decrease for gusset:

Rnd 1: Knit to last 3 stitches on needle 1, k2tog, k1. Continue working *k2, p1* across needle 2. K1, ssk, knit to end of needle 3.

Rnd 2: Knit across needle 1, work *k2, p1* rib across needle 2, knit across needle 3.

Repeat rounds 1 and 2 until 58 stitches are left. (18, 22, 18 sts on each of the three needles)

Foot:

Work even (pattern on upper foot and stockinette on the bottom) until sock reaches 8 3/4", or 2" less than desired foot length. The best thing is to measure the wearer's actual foot.

Decrease for toe:

Arrange sts as follows: Needle 1 - 14 sts; needle 2 - 29 sts; needle 3 - 15 sts.

Rnd 1: Needle 1: Knit to last 3 stitches on needle 1, k2tog, k1. Needle 2: K1, ssk, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1. Needle 3: K1, ssk, knit to end of needle.

Rnd 2: Knit around.

Repeat these 2 rounds until 22 stitches remain. Knit sts on needle 1 onto needle 3 (11 sts) and leave remaining sts (11) on needle 2. Graft the stitches together with kitchener stitch. Weave in ends. Make second sock.

 

 

 

 

 


Yarndemon Patterns on Blockstack

I've put my patterns on Sigle, which is a Blockstack blogging app. I plan to add a tip jar Bitcoin thing there too. The reason I am doing this is for my own security. If my patterns are on Blockstack, they will always be there and owned by me.

You can get to them HERE or just keep getting them on the regular internet too, right here on Yarndemon.com. My blog isn't changing, and I'll continue to post as usual.

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If you want more information about Blockstack, you can find it here: https://blockstack.org/


Knitting with the Fishes

Back in February (I think) I got the On the Round Signature Sock club yarn that was called Fish Bowl. I of course did not take a picture of it, but this is what is left:

IMG_0423

I love this yarn. It's like a little ball of delight that makes me happy.

First, I made Swedish Socks  by Spillyjane (US $6.00) using On the Round's Fish Bowl and Knitters Brewing Company Sock-aholic's Caribbean Happy Hour. They were fun to knit!

Swedish Fish Socks

Swedish Fish Close Up

Then I found a free hat pattern that I had to try because it was very pretty, and I could use the rest of my Fish Bowl, and it was a FREE PATTERN: Gluma Beanie by Tabitha Jarvis.

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Hey, I just found a picture of the hat's beginning that shows the yarn better!


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Actually the yarn has just a hint of pale green throughout it that for some reason my iPhone is ignoring. Pffft. But trust me, it is beautiful!

So that is what I've been doing, besides working sort of half-heartedly on the Drachen sweater which I am still mad at .... but that is another story.

IMG_0424

Drachen in timeout. Bad sweater, bad.

Pogo is mad at the sweater too.

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Cable and Bobble Beanie

A long time ago in a land called Unique One-land, I used to give classes to knitters. Once I gave a class on cables and bobbles, and I needed a pattern that they could use, but nothing was exactly what I needed, so I created a hat pattern with cables and bobbles in it. This is the hat. Originally it was knit in Classic Elite Wool Bamboo (50% wool, 50% bamboo), but of course it has long since been discontinued. Any DK weight will work though!
 
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Cable and Bobble Beanie

Materials:
◘ 200 yards DK weight yarn
◘ US size 3 (3.25mm) & US size 5 (3.50mm) straight needles (this hat was designed to be knit back and forth on straight needles *only* because I originally was designing it to be used in a cables & bobbles class I was going to teach, and I wanted the students to get the back-and-forth- ness of cable patterns, like they would use in knitting a sweater. Realistically, I would much rather have designed this for circular knitting, avoiding the seaming. You can certainly adapt it to that, if you know how to do it.)
◘ Cable needle
◘ Tapestry needle
 
Twisted Rib pattern (2 sts + 1):

Row 1: *K 1 through the back loop, P 1*, repeat from * to last stitch, K1 through back loop.
Row 2: *P 1, K 1 through the back loop*, repeat from * to last stitch, P1 through back loop.

Cable and Bobble Pattern Stitch (9 sts):
 
Row 1: Knit 9.
Row 2: Knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches.
Row3: Slip 2 sts to cable needle and hold in back, k2, k2 from cable needle, k1, slip 2 sts to cable needle and hold in front, k2, k2 from cable needle.
Row 5: Knit 4, (k1,p1,k1,p1,k1) all into the next st, turn, p back over these 5 sts, turn, k5, slip the first 4 sts one at a time over the end of the needle, leaving one knit stitch remaining [bobble made], knit 4.
Row 7: K3, make bobble, k1, make bobble, k3.
Row 8: Work as for Row 2.

Right Twist Cable Pattern Stitch (10 sts):

Row 1: P2, k6, p2.
Row 2: Knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches.
Row 3: P2, slip 3 sts to cable needle and hold in back, k3, k3 from cable needle, p2. Rows 5 & 7: P2, k6, p2.
Row 8: as for row 2.
 
Hat Pattern Stitch (133 + 4 sts):
 
Row 1: P2, (work cable and bobble pattern over 9 stitches, work right cable twist pattern over 10 sts) seven times, p2.
Row 2: Knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches.

Directions for knitting:

With smaller needles, cast on 101 sts. Work twisted rib for 8 rows, increasing to 137 sts in last row of ribbing. Change to US size 5 (3.50mm) needles. Work in Hat Pattern for 5 pattern repeats. Decrease as follows:
Row 1:P2, (K2 tog, p2, k2, p2, k2tog, work right cable twist pattern over 10 sts) 7 times, p2.
Row 2 and all even rows: knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches.
Row 3: P2, (p2tog, p1, k2, p2tog, p1, work right cable twist pattern over 10 sts) 7 times, p2.
Row 5: P2, (p2tog, k2, p2tog, work right cable twist pattern over 10 sts) 7 times, p2. Row 7: P2, (k2tog two times, work right cable twist pattern over 10 sts) 7 times, p2. Row 9: P1, (p2tog, work right cable twist pattern over 10 sts) 7 times, p2.
Row 11: P1, (p3tog, p1, k6, p1, p3tog, p1) 7 times, p2.
Row 13: (p3, k2tog three times) 7 times, p2.
Row 15: (P1, p2tog, k1, k2tog,) 7 times, p2.
Row 17: (p2 tog, k2tog) 7 times, p2tog.
Work Row 18 as Row 2.
 
Break yarn and pull it through all stitches. Pull tight to close the top of the hat. Sew up the seam.

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Enjoy your hat! I got thinking maybe I would redesign it in fingering weight also, and in the round. It'll be fun!
 
Pogo
Still a bit chilly out, Pogo is gonna sleep till it warms up.

Ribbed Leaves Lace Scarf

Ribbedleafscarf

This lovely pattern was on display at my shop, Unique One in Camden, Maine for years, and it was always very popular. It is a reversible pattern, which made it great for a scarf. It is basically ribbing with some left and right leaning decreases and a few eyelets thrown in to make it look lacy. Because the left and right decreases are done over ribbing, you have to use a cable needle to move the stitches to be next to each other so the ribbing  won't be discomposed.

It was originally knit with 3 skeins of Frogtree Fingering Weight Alpaca (215 yards/skein), now sadly discontinued. Alpaca made it feel luxurious, soft, and drapey, but you could use 645 yards of any type of fingering weight yarn, even bamboo or tencel or silk or cotton!

I have made one change to the original pattern in that I have started it with two rows of ribbing, as the way it was originally written was a little tricky to do on the first row, and I ended it with two rows of ribbing also to make it symmetrical.  Have fun!

 

Ribbed Leaves Lace Scarf

Materials: 645 yards (589.79 meters) light fingering weight yarn; US size 6 (4.00mm) needles, cable needle, tapestry needle

Finished size: 72 inches (182.88 cm) long X 7.5 inches (19.05 cm) wide

Directions:

Cast on 66 sts. Work K 1, P 1 ribbing for two rows. Work in Ribbed Leaves pattern as follows:

Rows 1, 3, 5, and 7 (RS): * K 1, P 1, yo twice, [K 1, P 1] twice, K 1, R2dec, [P 1, K 1] 5 times, P 1;  from * to end.

Row 2 and all WS rows: Work in K 1, P 1 rib, working double yo's as 2 stitches (i.e., K1, P1).

Rows 9, 11, 13, & 15: * [K 1, P 1] six times, L2dec, [K 1, P 1] twice, K 1, yo twice, P 1; repeat from * to end.

Row 16: Work as for Row 2.

Repeat these sixteen rows for Ribbed Leaves pattern.

Work in Ribbed Leaves pattern until scarf measures just shy of 72 inches long, or desired length. Work 2 rows K 1, P 1 ribbing. Bind off loosely. Weave in ends. 

Abbreviations used:

K = knit

P = purl

yo twice = yarn over twice (wrap the yarn two times around the needle; treat this as a knit stitch AND a purl stitch in the next row)

R2dec (Right decrease) = with yarn in front, slip the purl stitch to the  right hand needle, slip the knit stitch to the cable needle and hold it in front, slip the next purl stitch to the right hand needle, slip the knit stitch on the cable needle back to the left hand needle (2 knit sts are together now),  slip the 2 purl stitches back to the left hand needle, purl 2 together, knit 2 together

L2dec (Left decrease) = with yarn in back, slip the knit stitch to the right hand needle knitwise, slip the purl stitch to the cable needle and hold in back, slip the next knit stitch to the right hand needle knitwise, slip the purl stitch from the cable needle back to the left hand needle (knit stitches and purl stitches are together now), knit two stitches together through the back loops, purl two stitches together

 


Simplest Scarf in the World

1

 

Basketweave Scarf

Materials:

4 40g skeins Noro Cashmel (discontinued) or 150 yards of worsted weight soft yarn with a bit of drape. 

Size 7 knitting needles

Tapestry needle & scissors

Gauge: 20 sts and 28 rows = 4”

Finished measurements: 8” X 72”

Directions:

Cast on 35 stitches.

Rows 1, 3, 5, 7: Knit 5, (purl 5, knit 5) across
Rows 2, 4, 6, 8: Purl 5, (knit 5, purl 5) across
Rows 9, 11, 13, 15: Purl 5, (knit 5, purl 5) across
Rows 10, 12, 14, 16: Knit 5, (purl 5, knit 5) across

Repeat rows 1 - 16 for 72". Bind off loosely. Weave in & trim ends.

 

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DK Weight Ribbed Watch Cap

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DK Weight Ribbed Watch Cap

Size 5US/3.75mm 16"circular and double pointed needles

300 yards DK weight yarn

Gauge: 9 sts and 6.5 rows per inch measured over ribbing pattern lying at rest after washing

This will appear to be really skinny, but it stretches a lot!

Cast on 112 sts. Work in k2, p2 rib until piece measures 11 inches/28 centimetres. It will seem too long, but that is ok.

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Decrease for top:

Row 1: *Work 12 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 2 - 12: Work around with no decreases, keeping pattern as much as possible.

Row 3: *Work 11 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 5: *Work 10 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 7: *Work 9 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 9: *Work 8 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 11: *Work 7 sts, work 2 together* around. 

After completing Row 12, you can eliminate the even rounds in between the decrease rounds.

Row 13: *Work 6 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 14: *Work 5 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 15: *Work 4 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 16: *Work 3 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 17: *Work 2 sts, work 2 together* around. 

Row 18: *Work 1 st, work 2 together* around. 

Row 19: *Work 2 together* around. 

Cut yarn leaving a 6 inch end; pull the end through the remaining stitches secure it. Weave in ends. Fold up a 2" brim and wear proudly.


Resolutions

I used to  make resolutions in the new year: lose weight, exercise more, get a grip on my life, etc. You know what they say, better be careful what you wish for? Does the story of The Monkey's Paw come to mind? After I had my stroke, I had all the time in the world to knit; my life is much, much, to the point of being horrifying, simpler; I lost 60 pounds; and I walked about 10.000 steps a day (until I didn't; I should get back to it). Now I live a lot closer to the moment, so my resolutions are not as far ranging. They will involve knitting, because that is one thing I can count on. 

My Resolutions for 2018

1. For everything that I knit for myself (to give away or keep), I resolve to knit one or more items for charity. The homeless veterans that my friend Marie helps every December deserve so much; the least I can do is give them a warm hat or socks or mittens. As the wife of a veteran, I am appalled that our veterans don't get what they need, but that has always been the case. I am still appalled. Also, as I knit for the wonderful children in my life, I also know that other kids are without the warmth of a hand knitted hat or mittens to keep them warm when they play outside in the winter, and that is something I want to lend a hand in. There is a local school to which it will be very good to give little hats and mittens. My sister Rachel taught for years, and she always loved to get mittens and hats for kids who needed them. She knit for classrooms after she retired, so I will carry on the tradition.

2. Be happy. It's always a struggle. But, a happy knitter is a better knitter!

It's a pretty short list, but short lists are easier to achieve!

My brown Norderny is about 60% done:

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I bound off the body last night, and I will start knitting the sleeves today. I love this sweater!

I knit one hat for a veteran, and I am about 80% done a second one. They both look like this:

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The pattern is Barley from TinCanKnits and the yarn is Paintbox by Knit One, Crochet Too, now discontinued. TinCanKnits has so many wonderful free patterns! 

Nancy Howard, a valued Unique One employee, dropped off a bunch of yarn at my house. It was mostly on cones, and a couple  gigantic cones were sport weight acrylic, black and turquoise. I was thrilled at the black and turquoise, but not so thrilled that it was acrylic. But,  I twirled them together with a ply of sport weight wool in natural, et voilà! Visions of turquoise zebras danced in my head!

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Behold my Turquoise Zebra blanket! It's soft and cushy, and while it would be warmer if it were all wool, still, it is some good against the cold. I think I have enough yarn for two or three 4' x 6' blankets. The pattern I am using is Make A Long Story Short by Wanda Sowizdral. It is a free pattern and is written for fingering weight yarn, but my turquoise zebra yarn is on a US10.5/6.5mm needle, so it is bulky. I'll just knit it until it is about four feet up one side, and then I'll make it straight til it's about six feet, and then I will finish it off. Simple geometry. Bulky weight makes things go so much faster! 

Finally, here is the picture of  Sidney wearing her purple Aran coat. The grin is priceless!

 
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PurpleAran2


Harpswell Inn Cowl

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This cowl fits closely around the neck and is a really warm cowl. If you want it looser, you can make more squares or use a larger needle. Have fun! 

HARPSWELL INN COWL

(designed and knit at the Harpswell Inn Knitting Weekend, 2017)


1 skein Lamb’s Pride Worsted (MC)
1 skein Gina by Plymouth (CC)
(Two worsted weights, about 175 yards of MC and about 70 yards of CC)

Size 7 double pointed needles

16” size 7 circular needle  

Tapestry needle

OPTIONAL -- stitch markers, if you use a circular needle or two for Magic Loop method or two circulars method instead of using double pointed needles

Gauge: one square = 3.75 inches square

The cowl is made by knitting 2 tiers of 6 squares, each tier off-set by half a square to provide visual interest.

FIRST SQUARE:

With MC, cast on 60 sts on 4 needles (15 sts on each needle) OR divided into 4 sections with stitch markers and join into a round without twisting.
Round 1: Knit.
Round 2: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (13 sts per needle/marker section, 52 sts in the square)
Round 3: Purl.
Round 4: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (11 sts per needle/marker section, 44 sts in the square)
Round 5: Purl
Round 6: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (9 sts per needle/marker section, 36 sts in the square)
Round 7: Purl
Round 8: Knit

Cut yarn; attach CC.

Round 9: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (7 sts per needle/marker section, 28 sts in the square)
Round 10: Purl
Round 11: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (5 sts per needle/marker section, 20 sts in the square)
Round 12: Purl
Round 13: *Ssk, knit to last 2 sts on the needle/before the st marker, k2tog.* around. (3 sts per needle/marker section, 12 sts in the square)
Round 14: *Slip 2 sts as if to knit, k1, pull the 2 slipped stitches over the knit st -- double centered decrease made* around. (1 st per needle/marker section, 4 sts in the square)

Cut yarn and thread onto a tapestry needle, and run through the 4 sts and pull tight. Weave in all ends. *Weave in the ends as you go or there will be a LOT of ends to weave in at the end!*

SQUARES 2 THROUGH 5:

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the previous square with your needle; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on each needle/each section marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

SQUARE 6 (COMPLETES THE FIRST TIER AND JOINS THE CIRCLE TOGETHER):

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the previous square with your needle; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next needle/next section marked off by st markers; pick up 15 sts on Square 1 with your next needle; cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next needle/next section marked off by st markers; join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

You have 6 squares done! Now for the second tier of 6 squares.

SECOND TIER

SQUARE 7:

Pick a point about halfway along the edge of a square -- you can line up the center of the square to do this. With MC, pick up 15 sts on the edge of the squares with your needle (make sure you have ended picking up sts at the halfway point of the next square); using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on each needle/each section marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

SQUARES 8 - 11:

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the edge of the square just made; pick up 15 sts along the bottom edge of squares of the first tier with your needle, making sure that the sts end up about halfway along this square; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next two needles/on next two sections marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends.

SQUARE 12 (JOINS 2ND TIER INTO A CIRCLE):

With MC, pick up 15 sts on the edge of the square just made; pick up 15 sts along the bottom edge of squares of the first tier with your needle, making sure that the sts end up about halfway along this square; using other needles/using st markers to separate sts, pick up 15 sts on the edge of Square 7; cast on with backward loop method 15 sts on next two needles/on next two sections marked off by st markers and join into a round without twisting. (60 sts).

Work Rounds 1 - 14 and finish as before, weaving in ends. Now you have two tiers of squares and your cowl is almost done.

ATTACHED I-CORD FINISHING:

Using CC, cast on 4 sts and then continue to pick up 100 sts around the edge of the cowl. Work attached i-cord as follows: *Knit 3 sts, k2tog; put 4 sts back on your left needle*. Repeat between *’s around the edge of the cowl. Sew i-cord ends together with a couple stitches and weave in ends.

Repeat for other edge.

 


So Much Fun!

I have had so much fun the last couple of weeks! 

First, the things I have knitted: not much, actually. I have my stealth knitting project almost completed. In fact, it will be finished this week probably, and I can go to Freeport at the end of the week with a clear conscience. I have, in addition, sewn up my Sylvi coat/sweater, woven in most of the ends, and am now working on the hood:

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It is kind of hard to knit because of the weight of the sweater and only having one and a quarter hands, but it is going slowly onward. I hope to finish it next week, after SPA in Freeport. At least Hillary will be able to wear it for a couple weeks before Spring!

Second is the goodies that I have bought.

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I pre-ordered MAINEknits by Beatrice Perron Dahlen a few weeks ago, and promptly forgot it, and then there it was! I wanted to get it when I realized that all of the patterns in it were in my favorites in Ravelry, which was a sign that the book needs to be on my shelf.  I was pleased to find that the book has really gorgeous pictures of Maine, a foreword by Pam Allen, and well-written essays by Sarah Kilch Gaffney, Julie Letowski, Samantha Lindgren and Beck Robbins in addition to beautiful, highly-wearable and desirable-to-knit patterns by fourteen excellent designers, including Beatrice Perron Dahlgren. 

The book is divided into three sections: Sea, Farm, and Wild, which is how I think of Maine too. I'm from Aroostook county, Maine, the wilderness was all around me in Portage where I lived, my father was a farmer, and now I live by the sea! There are five or six patterns in each section, totaling seventeen patterns in the book. Most of them are sweaters and accessories for women, but a few are unisex too, and one is photographed on a man and a child; that sweater can be made in children's sizes too. There is also a cowl in child and adult sizes as well. 

I also got some little colored stitch markers from Cocoknits.com. They are so pretty, I want to string them on a chain and wear them as a necklace! 

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I succumbed to pattern lust and bought the yarn to make these socks:

They are 173-45 Sleepy Sheep from Drops.

Karisma

They are so springy and pretty! I don't really need 450g of yarn to knit socks. I'll have yarn leftover, so maybe I will design something with Mary Jane Mucklestone's books that I have been looking over.

The best thing though is the fluff that I got from On the Round! It is soooooooo gorgeous! It makes me want to spin and spin and spin! 

Fluff

This fluff is hand dyed Corriedale top in a OOAK (One Of A Kind)  color. That means it is unique!  Rachel Jones does an incredible job of dyeing. Her colors are imaginative, playful, and creative while being harmonious too. It takes real talent to do that. I will wait as long as possible to start spinning this, but I think the beauteousness of the fluff will overwhelm me. It is sitting right beside my computer and I keep looking at it and sighing happily. I need to get a couple things done, but soon ... soon!

The third and final fun thing is ahead: SPA!!! Lynne and I are going to Freeport for the weekend (February 24,25, & 26) and we will have so much fun. We are staying at the Hampton Inn. SPA is a weekend of fibery goodness that is at three hotels in Freeport, but it really kind of takes over the town. It is like a convention of 1000 (maybe more) knitters and crocheters and spinners and weavers and felters and other fibery folk who show up for the weekend. Some people go for three or four days. Lynne and I will pretty much stay in the Hampton Inn; the vendor area doesn't really interest me much (see above) but there are many vendors and people who want their wares. Also Mother of Purl is in the area and there are a few things that they offer too this weekend, including an On the Round trunk show -- Rachel will be there in person to amaze and delight you! 

Pogo's Sweater

I haven't the heart to tell Pogo that the sweater isn't for her.


Project Peace

Blogger Christina is trying to change the world, and I think she is succeeding. Her blog The Healthy Knitter is having a 21-day tips for peace during December, and it coincides with a "Peace-along" on Ravelry, with her free pattern for a lovely cowl. My Daily Mindfulness blanket has languished but it will still be there in January. I'm going to join her for the peace-along, and I urge you to join me too! 

Project peace

So far she has gotten over 20,000 people to read her peace tips every day and join her peace-along. That is 20,000 individual people whose lives she has impacted in  a good way, a peaceful way. 

"And we need peace…with turmoil, and acts of violence, hatred and anger occurring daily in our country and throughout the world it’s time to take action. Often I think "but I’m just one person" but maybe, just maybe with Project Peace we can spread ideas on how to choose peace. Perhaps then, we can slowly make some changes. We’ll never overcome evil but we must find ways to cope with it."

from The Healthy Knitter, November 10, 2016

So, what do you do? Here is what she said back in November:

Here's how you join in:

  • Download the cover page of the pattern on Ravelry
  • This is only the cover page; the pattern will come to you as an update on 11/28.
  • Read the information about the project requirements
  • Please click on "fav" on Ravelry, begin a project page for the cowl, and join the Healthy Knitter group.
  • Beginning December 1, read the blog daily for 21 days to receive the tip of the day on how to infuse more peace into your life.

Will you help me promote this?

Here are some ideas on how you could spread the word:

  • Spotlight Project Peace on a blog post
  • Post on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or other forms of social media
  • Include in your electronic or print newsletter
  • Provide a give-away to those that help spread the word
  • Tell all your knitting friends, clients, customers, readers, family.

Also, there is a World-wide Knit-in for Peace on December 21. Will you will knit for peace on that day?

I think this is a great idea! It is sort of like SETI, but instead of helping to locate alien signals, we will be promoting world peace! Using knitting needles! I can get behind that.

My project for peace will be Christina Campbell's cowl knit in Wildwood Yarns Arcadia in a pretty blue-pink-purple colorway. To me, it looks like peace. 

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Heck, whatever you do to be mindful and peaceful would work too! Whether you draw, crochet, quilt, craft, sew, doodle, whittle sticks or make baskets, just do it. Be peaceful, and help others be peaceful too!

 


It's Winter, So Get Over It: Make a Cowl, Not a Scowl!

Everyone is crabby, because all they can see is snow, snow, snow and more snow. More is falling as I speak. When I was a kid, up in northern Maine, this kind of winter was typical. For the past number of years we haven't had a winter with all this snow, and it is hard to go back to it now. It's hard to drive in, it's cold, and it's boring. I hear on Facebook that kids are out of school and driving their parents crazy, and business owners complain that no one is out shopping because they're all holed up at home. That is true. 

Yarn shops that are lucky enough to be in a town with a sidewalk to their door are doing some walk-in business, and you can always order yarn in if you need to. I ordered a skein of Ontheround's Merino Wool Aran Weight when it was on sale a while ago, and over the fall I hugged it and petted it. It's so soft and squishy and lovable. The colors are a blend of green and yellow and white and blue and gray, beautifully dyed, and over this winter it has seemed like a touch of Spring. However, I needed something warm, so I invented a cowl that sits around my neck and shoulders, keeping me warm, and looking pretty. 

Yarma_medium2-2    Yarma_medium2-1    Yarma_medium2

I'm giving the pattern to you:

Stranded Cowl by Beth Collins

Ontheround Merino Worsted 
Size US10.5/6.5mm 16” circular needle

Gauge: 
15.5 sts and 22 rnds = 10 x 10 cm/4” x 4”

Finished measurements: 7" high by 28" around

Cast on 112 stitches (I like it loose; use 100 stitches if you want it tighter. Pattern is a multiple of 4.) Join, being careful not to twist the stitches.

(Knit a round, purl a round) twice. Begin Woven Stitch pattern:

Round 1:•K2, yf, sl2, yb; rep from • to end. 
Round 2: Knit. 
Round 3: •Yf,sl2,yb, k2; rep from • to end. 
Round 4: Knit.

Repeat these 4 rounds for pattern. Work in pattern for 7” or desired height. (Knit a round, purl a round) twice. Bind off loosely and weave in ends.

Abbreviations: 
k = knit 
p = purl 
yf = yarn to front 
yb = yarn to back 
sl = slip

(Pattern Stitch “Double Woven Stitch I” adapted from the Harmony Guides Knit & Purl, edited by Erika Knight, p. 76)

The center picture above shows that I had only a little yarn leftover, so if you want a higher cowl, you may want another skein.

I may have to knit another cowl with Ontheround's new DK weight yarn. She certainly makes wonderful yarn! 

I found that stranding the yarn across two stitches was a good way to show off the yarn; hand dyed yarn can be gorgeous in the skein, but sometimes it is disappointing knit up. Stranding really showed the beautiful colors as well as the thick-and-thin quality of the yarn. I love that.

Knitting needle Knitting needle

In other news, my Aran sweater is done. I took some pictures of it before it was whisked away upstairs to be worn today. It fits perfectly :)

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SA_Nicky2_medium

It looked better with Nicky sleeping on it, but this is pretty good :)





Baby Cables Fingerless Mitts

The last Unique One Knitting Weekend that I went to, back in March 2010, I gave out this pattern for baby-cable fingerless mittens -- they are quick, easy mitts and are a warming touch when the air gives you a chill. They are also a good gift to make for Christmas, and since some people are thinking about that, I thought I would put the pattern here. I somehow dimly recall doing that once before, but I can't find where I did it, so I'll put it on my blog once again with a link on the side. Happy knitting!

BabyCableMitts

Baby Cables Fingerless Mittens

Materials: 2 skeins USDK yarn (light dk weight, 100% wool, 88 yards per skein) size 2 double pointed needles

tapestry needle

Size: womenʼs small (you could make a medium or a large by going up one or two needle sizes; USDK is squishy, so it works well on a size 2 needle, but it would work very well on up to a size 6 needle.)

Gauge: 7 sts and 9 3/4 stitches per inch over stockinette stitch on size 2 needles Pattern Stitches:

Baby Cable Pattern (worked in the round):

Rounds 1, 2, & 4: (K2, P2) around. Round 3: (RT, P2) around

RT = knit into the 2nd stitch on the left hand needle, but do not take the stitch off; knit into the first stitch on the left hand needle, and then take both stitches off.

Baby Cable Pattern (worked in rows): Rows 1, 2 & 4 : K1, (K2, P2) to last stitch, K1.

Row 3: K1, (RT, P2) to last stitch, K1.

Directions:

Cast on 60 sts. Work Baby Cable Pattern in the round for 3 1/2 inches or desired length to bottom of thumb. End having just completed either Round 2 or Round 4, and increase one stitch at each end of last round.

Create thumb opening: Stop working in the round, and continue working on double pointed needles, but going back and forth (when you reach the end of the round, turn the work and go back the other direction.) Keeping Baby Cable pattern as established, work Baby Cable pattern worked in rows (see pattern stitch above) until piece measures 5 3/4 inches from beginning. Decrease one stitch at each end of last row.

Finish top of mitt: Join work back into a round again and keep working Baby Cable Pattern as established, working in rounds again, until mitten measures 1 1/2 inches above where you joined it, or desired length to top of mitten. Bind off loosely in pattern and weave in ends. 

 


Designed by Beth: 2 Color Hat

What a charming title, right? I must have been feeling really unimaginative when I came up with that one, sheesh.

Anyway, it's another hat pattern, and though it is pictured in purple and white (I used lupine and natural Bartlettyarn), it looks fantastic in more manly colors too, and it's a pretty quick knit for the holiday season.

2colorHat

2-Color Hat

Materials:

•Bartlettyarn or Christopher Sheep Farm yarn: 1 skein each Color A (main color) and Color B (contrast color)

•size 7 16-inch circular needle

•size 7 double pointed needles

•a tapestry needle

 

Gauge: 4 1/2 sts and 5 rows equals 1 inch in Fair Isle pattern; 4 3/4 sts and 7 rows equals 1 inch in plain stockinette

Size: Adult Medium

Hem: With Color A and circular needle, cast on 96 sts. Join, being careful not to twist sts. Place marker to mark end of round. Work in stockinette stitch for 24 rounds. Form Picot Edge: (yo, k2tog) around. Working in stockinette, join Color B and complete Trim chart 1; work 1 round plain in Color A; work Snowflake chart 2; work 1 round plain in Color A; work Trim chart 3. Break off Color B. Work even in Color A until 6 inches or fesired height above Picot Edge.

Decrease for top: Work as follows, switching to double pointed needles when necessary.

Round 1: *k 2, k2tog* around.

Rounds 2 - 7: Knit around.

Round 8: *k 1, k2tog* around.

Rounds 9 - 12: Knit around.

Round 13: *k 1, k2tog*around.

Round 14 - 16: Knit around.

Round 17: *k 1, k2tog*around.

Round 18: Knit around.

Round 19: *k2tog* around.

Break yarn, pull end through all remaining stitches and pull to tighten the top together. Weave in all ends on the inside. Sew hem to inside of hat. Attach pom pom or tassel if desired.

Charts

Glossary and Abbreviations:

K = knit

p=purl

st(s) = stitch(es)

k2tog=knit2stitchestogether

 

Download 2-Color Hat.pdf (206.3K)

Designed by Beth: Two Watch Caps

It's time to start the Christmas knitting, so here are two little watch caps for the men in your life. They fit women, too! 

WatchCap_medium

Fingering Weight Ribbed Watch Cap

1 Size: Men's medium          

Yarn: 1 skein Trekking XXL or other sock/fingering/baby yarn
Needles: 16" circular and double pointed needles, size 2
Gauge: 15 sts = 1" in unstretched knit 2, purl 2 ribbing
Cast on 168 sts. Join, being careful not to twist. Work in knit 2, purl 2 ribbing until piece measures 9 1/2". 
Decrease for top:
Work 1 rnd in ribbing, placing markers as follows: work 20, pm, k 2, pm, work 42, pm, k 2, pm, work 38, pm, k 2, pm, work 42, pm, k 2, pm, work 18.
Rnd 1: Keeping ribbing intact, *work to within 2 sts of marker, work 2 sts tog, slip marker, k 2, slip marker, work 2 sts together, repeat from * around, end knitting the remaining sts.
Rnd 2: Work 1 round even.
Repeat these two rnds until you have 56 sts remaining. K2tog around.
Cut yarn, leaving a long tail. Run tail through the stitches and draw them up tight. Weave end in on inside. Weave in the tail.

 


Hat_medium

Worsted Weight Watch Cap

Gauge

5.5 stitches per inch, 7.5 rows per inch

Size

Adult Medium 

Materials:  

215  yards yards worsted weight yarn

Size 6 douple pointed or 16-in. circular needles

Cast on 108 sts. Place marker, join. 

Edging

Round 1: *K2, p2. Repeat from * to end of the round.

Repeat Round 1 until piece measures 5" or desired length from the cast-on edge (watch cap has a turned up ribbing).

 Body

Work in stockinette stitch until piece measures 10" or desired length from the cast-on edge.

 Crown

On the next round (work 11 sts, k2tog) 4 times. Then (work 12 sts, k2tog) 4 times. [100 sts]

Work one round even.

Round 1: *Work 8, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [90 sts remain]

Round 2: Work even

Round 3: *Work 7, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [80 sts remain]

Round 4: Work even

Round 5: *Work 6, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [70 sts remain]

Round 6: Work even

Round 7: *Work 5, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [60 sts remain]

Round 8: Work even

Round 9: *Work 4, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [50 sts remain]

Round 10: Work even

Round 11: *Work 3, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [40 sts remain]

Round 12: Work even

Round 13: *Work 2, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [30 sts remain]

Round 14: Work even

Round 15: *Work 1, k2tog. Repeat from * around. [20 sts remain]

Round 16: Work even

Round 17: *K2tog. Repeat from * around. [10 sts remain]

 

Finishing

Cut yarn, a generous tail. Draw tail through remaining stitches on the needle. Pull gently to close hole. Weave in tail.

Weave in ends.

 


Designed by Beth: Wandering Path Socks

I designed these socks for the knitting cruise, and I knit two pair of them, one in blue and the other pair in purple. I still wear them today. I loved knitting them, and I hope you like to  knit them too!

Wandering Path Socks

Wandering path socks

 

Materials:

Size 2 double pointed needles

100 grams fingering weight sock yarn 

 

Gauge: 7 sts per inch

 

Cast on 60 sts and join without twisting. Work knit 1, purl 1 ribbing for 1 1/2 inches. Increase to 72 sts in the last row of ribbing.

 

Work Wandering Path Sock chart until sock leg measures about 7 or 8 inches, ending with row 16.

Chart

Divide stitches in half and work heel flap over 36 sts, working back and forth on 2 needles: 

Row 1: *slip one, knit one* across, turn.

Row 2: Slip first stitch and then purl the rest of the stitches in the row. 

Repeat these 2 rows 17 times. Work Row 1 one more time. 

 

Turn heel: 

Row 1: Purl 20, purl 2 together, purl one, turn. 

Row 2: Slip one, knit 5, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn. 

Row 3: Slip one, purl 6, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 4:Slip one, knit 7, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn. 

Row 5: Slip one, purl 8, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 6: Slip one, knit 9, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

Row 7: Slip one, purl 10, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 8: Slip one, knit 11, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

Row 9: Slip one, purl 12, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 10: Slip one, knit 13, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

Row 11: Slip one, purl 14, purl 2 together, purl 1, turn.

Row 12: Slip one, knit 15, knit 2 together through the back loops, knit 1, turn.

 Pick up 18 stitches along side of heel flap, knit across 36 stitches from top of foot, pick up 18 stitches on other side of heel flap, knit half of the stitches for the heel flap.

Decrease gusset stitches:

 Round 1: Needle 1: Knit to last 3 stitches on needle 1, k2tog, k1; Needles 2 & 3:  knit across; Needle 4: k1, ssk, knit to end of needle.

Round 2: Knit around. 

Repeat Rounds 1 and 2 until a total of 72 sts remain (18 sts on each needle). 

Continue working in stockinette stitch until foot measure 7 1/2 inches, or 1 3/4 inches less that total length of foot. 

 

Work toe:

Round 1: Needle 1 & Needle 3: Knit to last 3 stitches, k2tog, k 1; Needle 2 & Needle 4: k1, ssk, knit to end; 

Round 2: Knit around. 

Repeat Rounds 1 and 2 until 36 sts remain. Then work Round 1 only until there are 4 sts on each of the needles (16 sts). Knit across sts on Needle 1. Place sts from Needles 1 and 4 on one dpn and put sts from Needles 2 & 3 on another dpn, and Kitchener stitch the toe together. Weave in ends.

 

 

 

 


Designed By Beth: Braided Cable Scarf

Braided Cable Scarf

Braided Cable Scarf

This cabled scarf is fun to knit, and itʼs reversible, too!

Materials:

Size 10.5 needles

2 hanks Blueberry Farm alpaca/merino/silk (or about 210 yards of sport/dk weight yarn)

Special cable stitches:

C6B: put 6 stitches on cable needle, hold at back of work, work next 6 stitches in K1, P1 as established, work stitches from cable needle in K1, P1 as established

C6F: put 6 stitches on cable needle, hold at front of work, work next 6 stitches in K1, P1 as established, work stitches from cable needle in K1, P1 as established

Directions: Cast on 28 sts. Work in the following pattern until you are nearly out of yarn; bind off

loosely.

Rows 1 - 5: K5, (K1,P1) 9 times, K2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

Row 6: K 5, (k1, p1) 3 times, C6B, K2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

Rows 7- 11: K5, (K1,P1) 9 times, K2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

Row 12: K 5, C6F, (k1, p1) 3 timesK2, bring yarn to front, slip last 3 sts as if to purl.

(Repeat these 12 rows for pattern.)



Pattern Referrals

One of my biggest referring websites is Knitting Pattern Central. They have my Gansey Gloves, Net Shopping Bag, Rainy Day Scarf (also known as the Wavy Scarf), and the Bobble Hat listed in their free pattern directory. I get about 100 hits a day from them.

Bobblehat-full

I wonder how many hits a day I would get if the Penobscot Bay Pullover, the Catnip Mouse, and the Lacy Scarf were on there, too. The Penobscot Bay Pullover was always popular when I had the store. especially since it was great for men and kids. So was the Lacy Scarf, for that matter.

Pbgphoto

I also get significant numbers from Tipnut.com and Curbly.com, for my Net Shopping Bag pattern. Who knew such a little thing would be so popular! AllFreeKnitting.com has also got the Net Shopping Bag, and there's a link to it on KnittingHelp.com. Yarnover.net has a link to my Ribbed Leaves Lace Scarf pattern.

Netbag-full

I designed nearly all of these patterns for the knitting cruises or the knitting weekends that Unique One used to hold at the Lord Camden Inn. Since my stroke, I have designed only three things. And, I have a few things that I have designed that aren't up anywhere.

How many of my designs have you knit? I'm curious.

Ganseyglove_1-full


Diagonal Rib Scarf

This pattern is so simple, but I thought you'd like to have it. It was really the beginning to my Rainy Day Scarf idea. I originally knit it to show off the yarn samples we got from Earthtones handspun yarn, and kept it out with the yarn, and so many people asked for the pattern that I handed it out. When Earthtones left for greener pastures (Colorful Stitches in Lenox, Massachusetts) I was very happy to see the yarn take off; however, they wanted to have the yarn exclusively, and I knew they could order a lot more than I could, so I let it go.

The scarf has a ribbing pattern that goes diagonally up the scarf. It's easily memorized, makes great TV knitting, and it's reversible, which is always nice in a scarf. It's written for sport weight yarn, but you could use any yarn, really. It's good for my handspun! Even under plied handspun!

I'll add a picture to the pattern as soon as I knit one up. (The Earthtones one is long gone.)

Here ya go:


DIAGONAL RIB SCARF


MATERIALS:  2 2-oz. skeins sportweight Earthtones handspun yarn
                  size 8 (5 mm) straight needles
Gauge varies and really, it's only a scarf.
Pattern is a multiple of 4, plus 2.
Cast on 42 sts. Knit 2 rows. Work in diagonal rib pattern until piece measures 482 or desired length. Knit 2 rows. Bind off all sts. Add fringe, if desired.

Diagonal Rib pattern:

Row 1: K 1, *p2, k2, repeat from * to last st, k1.

Row 2: K1, p1, *k2, p2, repeat from * to last 4 sts, k2, p1, k1.

Row 3: K3, *p2, k2, repeat from * to last 3 sts, p2, k1.

Row 4: K2; *p2, k2, repeat from * to end.

Repeat these 4 rows for pattern.  

Stop when you run out of yarn! 

 


Fun Things I Found on the Internet

1. Did you know there's a knitted Mona Lisa?

MonaLisa
(Photo Credit: Steve Plummer)

It's done in shadow knitting; you can see it here. Pat Ashforth and Steve Plummer, two retired math teachers, have launched into a world of "Illusion Knitting" and have lots of fun things on their web site. You can even buy patterns! (Here is the link on Ravelry; they also have very cool mathematical knitted stuff too!

2. A Dalek Doggy suit.

IMG_1548_medium2

(Photo Credit: Peach Kraft on Ravelry)

Ya gotta love it, even if it does exterminate you. This is a free Ravelry download pattern, so go nuts.

3. Doctor Jayne Hat:

Doctor_Jayne_Hat_2

(Photo Credit: holynarf (Lindsay)

It's a Jayne hat in construction, but with the fourth Doctor Who scarf colors. I think it's totally awesome. I hesitate to knit the really loooong Doctor Who scarf, but a hat ... seems like a good compromise. I love that it's the best of two worlds, too. It's just awesome. The pattern is here and on Ravelry (free download)

That's all for today! You never know what I'll turn up next!


Housework

Sharon asked me for my catnip mouse pattern, and it got me thinking I should rearrange my whole blog -- you know, the sidebar stuff that I usually don't change. So I did; do you like it? Most importantly, I put all the patterns, which I have put here on the blog over the years, under "Beth's Free Patterns" as links on the side, so you can get at them easily. The catnip mouse is on the top of the pile.

In exchange, what I would like is for people to send me pictures of the mice they have knit with their (or someone else's) cat(s) playing with them. Don't worry, there's no knitting police, you don't have to do it, but I think it would be fun because I have a cat obsession. And if you have pictures of any of my other patterns you've knit, throw their pictures in, too (cats are not necessary, but welcomed in these pictures). It will give me a warm feeling to see the stuff I have designed coming to life. That's one thing I miss about the knitting cruises and the knitting shop; I never get to see that stuff anymore! I will post your pictures here on my blog only if you give me your permission, I promise.

Grace 

"Please send your pictures so Mommy won't chase us around with a camera anymore. It's frightening."


MuckleMitts!

My friend Mary Jane just put a great pattern on her blog. It's Mucklemitts, and she used Motif #172 from her fabulous book, 200 Fair Isle Motifs: A Knitter's Directory. It's a great pattern, it'll bust your stash, and I'm gonna knit a pair! I have ordered Mary Jane's book too; I can't wait to get it. The MucklestoneMitts pattern is a good illustration of what  to do with her book -- use it!

MuckleMittsPhoto from http://maryjanemucklestone.com

The vest is coming along well; I've indented the armholes and I have about 6" done on the upper part. That leaves 6 1/2" to go. Then I've got the front and the neckband and armbands to do .... and then sewing it together. Should be fun.

Vest2

The catnip mice I knit for Nick, Nora and Grace turned out great. This picture is them before they were set loose among the cats:

CatnipMice

The have been well played with. I love how my cats love their toys :)